SAN MATEO COUNTY

County Offices
400 County Center
Redwood City 650-363-4123
www.smcgov.org

Chamber of Commerce
1700 S El Camino Real #406
San Mateo 650-304-2441
https://sanmateochamber.org/

 

Major Highways
Interstate 280, US Highway 101, Route 92

Sharing the Peninsula with the City of San Francisco, San Mateo County is ideally located at the crossroads of three major freeways. The topography of the region includes a lush, hilly countryside graced by bay and ocean coastlines, creating a panoramic backdrop for the unbroken chain of suburbs along El Camino Real. Originally known as the old “Royal Road,” the historic thoroughfare of El Camino Real once connected some of the first Spanish mission settlements in the Golden State. The coastal mountain range running north and south divides the lightly populated western region from the heavily populated eastern corridor that stretches from San Francisco on the north to Santa Clara County and Silicon Valley on the south.

The throngs of Bay Area commuters who have chosen a community in San Mateo County as their residential haven are following a rich legacy that dates back to the 19th century. Some of San Francisco’s earliest gold, silver, and railroad magnates looked to scenic San Mateo County as the ideal location for their palatial homes and posh country clubs. From its first luxurious roots, the county matured and expanded over the decades, adding tracts of modest homes and bungalows, bustling commercial centers, planned communities, and prestigious developments that included stately mansions and custom homes.

San Mateo today continues the legacy of its genesis, ranking among the wealthiest of California’s counties. As a favored residential location for Bay Area residents, the county became so densely settled in the population explosion that rocked the Peninsula after World War II that government planners were forced to concentrate on preserving open space. While the census is still swelling, the concerted effort to protect undeveloped land has slowed the flood to a more manageable stream of residential and business newcomers.

Although San Mateo County has long been a suburban retreat for those employed in Bay Area employment centers in Silicon Valley or San Francisco, the area’s scenic beauty and charm have attracted an impressive list of high-tech companies, retail centers, industrial parks, and service industries. Yes, the agricultural impact on the economy is still significant, led by flower and nursery crops. However, fruits, vegetables, and livestock are just a fragment of the today’s story. Through the decades, the county has developed its own attractions and economy, reversing traditional commuter patterns. Executive suburbs now share the region’s mild climate and abundant sunshine with tree-shaded housing developments, diversified industries, and innovative businesses.

 

Services
The close proximity of international centers of excellence like Stanford University and its related research facilities have drive the proliferation of high-tech businesses. The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is Menlo Park is a two-mile-long linear electron accelerator that explores the small particles of atoms. So advanced and significant is the research at this facility that work on particle beams resulted in a Nobel Prize in physics in 1976. Called “Software Valley” by some, San Mateo combines corporate headquarters with software-industry leaders and biotechnology-related employers.

In many communities, a regional healthcare institution is one of the primary employers. Kaiser Permanente has established major medical centers in South San Francisco and Redwood City, while the Mills-Peninsula Medical Center divides campuses between Burlingame and San Mateo. Nearby Palo Alto offers the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital affiliated with Stanford Hospital. Also in neighboring Palo Alto is the Stanford Hospital and Clinics, a global leader in diagnostics and innovative treatment. Other excellent hospitals combine with private and public support facilities like as emergency clinics, convalescent hospitals, and rehabilitation centers to meet every healthcare need.

Education is another point of excellence for San Mateo County, where public school districts benefit from innovative teaching techniques and the cooperation of parents, teachers, and the local business community. Dozens of private schools are scattered throughout the county —both church-affiliated and independent — to offer families a full range of educational choices. Educational resources also support the advancement of new technologies, providing the skills and training for emerging industries.

A trio of convenient community colleges ensures opportunities for technical and vocational training, college-track programs, Associate’s degrees, and certifications. Canada College in Redwood City, the College of San Mateo in San Mateo, and Skyline College in San Bruno offer educational opportunities while they enrich the surrounding communities with athletic facilities, expansive libraries, and cultural amenities. The Bay Area has long been known for its superb colleges and universities, including institutions with international reputations for excellence like Stanford and some of California’s most acclaimed public universities.

Students, commuters, visitors, and residents alike enjoy an efficient network of interstates and major highways in San Mateo County, linking each community with San Francisco to the north, San Jose to the south, and the East Bay to the east. Even though San Francisco has retained ownership of its international airport, the facility is actually located in South San Francisco —encompassed in the boundaries of San Mateo County. While it’s true that many residents still prefer driving a private car to work, shopping, school and entertainment; public transportation systems are continually expanding and improving. A growing number of commuters are discovering that BART light rail and buses are the least expensive and most carefree way to reach their destination.

 

Lifestyle
With its rustic small towns, balanced cities, and flourishing metropolitan centers, San Mateo County provides a full complement of environments and possibilities to support virtually any lifestyle choice. Newcomers can choose from the golden sunsets and rugged coastline of Pacifica, the rustic charm of Half Moon Bay, the vintage neighborhoods of San Mateo, or elegant modern developments in Foster City. Equestrians will want to explore the home sites and horse ranches in Woodside, while boaters and water sports enthusiasts can choose from several lovely bayside or coastal communities with outstanding marinas.

The moderate climate and comfortable year-round temperatures, the abundance of quality amenities, and well-educated residents make San Mateo County one of the West Coast’s most desirable locations. Probably the most outstanding of the area’s undeveloped land preserves in the San Francisco Watershed. Covering 23,000 acres of scenic woodland preserves, five lakes, and gentle hills, the region is traversed by winding roads that climb up and over ridges to provide spectacular vistas of the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Bay to the east. A number of parks are nestled within this expanse of coastal mountains, while beaches along the coast near San Gregorio and Pescadero are popular with surfers and sunbathers. Small, independent recreational facilities dot the region, from handsome stables with equestrian trails to small boat marinas and private aircraft airports.

Shoppers who appreciate quality as highly as they value convenience will soon discover that San Mateo County provides an abundance of both. In charming shopping districts, exclusive boutiques mix with casual shops filled with sportswear. Charmin  g historic districts abound, offering a delightful mix of bookstores, bakeries, specialty shops, antique stores, galleries, and bed-and-breakfast inns. Some retail centers even hug the waterfront, ensuring refreshing breezes and relaxing outdoor dining experiences. For a full day of mall shopping, major centers are scattered throughout the Peninsula. Neighboring Palo Alto features the Stanford Shopping Center, a premier mall where lush gardens create the backdrop for the nation’s leading retailers. On the weekend, few activities are more relaxing than selecting fresh fruits and vegetables from roadside stands, pick-your-own farms, or parking-lot farmer’s markets.

Accommodating a wide variety of lifestyles, living needs, and income levels, the cities and communities of San Mateo County offer superb housing options. An attractive selection of apartments, condominiums, and townhouses combine with single-family homes in a variety of architectural styles, settings, and price ranges. Uncompromising value and superior craftsmanship are the hallmarks of many of the area’s foremost builders, who carefully select the finest properties and view lots for development. Although a few meticulously renovated Victorians and handsome Mediterraneans grace the tree-shaded lots in long-established neighborhoods, many developments of newer construction offer everything from dramatic Spanish courtyards to the most modern of architectural lines.

In spite of the small-town spirit and warmth that characterizes San Mateo’s communities, world-class cosmopolitan attractions are just minutes from home. Sports enthusiasts need only travel as far as Oakland, San Francisco, or San Jose to see their favorite professional teams in the fury of league competition. Fanatic fans flock to see the Oakland Raiders and 49’ers football, San Francisco Giants and Oakland Athletics (A’s) baseball, Golden State Warriors basketball, SaberCats arena football, San Jose Earthquakes soccer,  San Jose Sharks hockey, and San Jose Stealth lacrosse. To the east, Sacramento offers Kings basketball and world team tennis with the Capitals.

For weekend getaways or vacations within easy driving distance, San Mateo County serves as the doorway to some of California’s most beloved destinations. The former Olympic ski site of Squaw Valley and many other wonderful alpine resorts are less than a half-day’s drive from home. The famous wine country of Napa, Russian River, and Sonoma Valley is waiting to the north, while Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay coastal communities are less than a two-hour drive. At the edge of the East Bay lies the California Delta, where 1,000 miles of sparkling waterways connect the San Francisco Bay with the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers to provide some of California’s finest opportunities for water sports, fishing, and boating.

The San Francisco Bay Area is well known for year-round sailing, while the city itself glistens as one of the world’s most attractive and unique metropolitan centers. Aficionados of the performing arts can take advantage of San Francisco’s nationally acclaimed symphony, opera, theatre, and ballet. Internationally recognized museums, gardens, entertainment spots, shopping districts, scientific exploration centers, and galleries abound. For those who desire the best of all worlds, few locales in the nation can rival San Mateo County for natural beauty, quality of life, and sheer enjoyment.

 

Atherton
Municipal Offices
650-752-0500
www.ci.atherton.ca.us

Chamber of Commerce
1700 S El Camino Real #406
San Mateo 650-304-2441
https://sanmateochamber.org/

Located on the Peninsula just north of internationally renowned Stanford University, the town of Atherton is home to a cosmopolitan population dominated by professionals and prominent figures in government, education, industry, sports, and the arts. Unlike many of the Bay Area communities, Atherton’s modest population has remained stable over the past two decades — a trend that is expected to continue. The traditionally residential flavor of Atherton is strictly protected by a land-use plan that prohibits commercial or industrial development. Influenced in part by the powerful presence of Stanford University, the outstanding caliber of public and private schools in Atherton not only serves area youth but attracts students from surrounding communities. City planners and residents are finely tuned to the same overall mission: To preserve the advantages of a small town atmosphere in close proximity to all the cultural, recreational, and economic opportunities afforded by the San Francisco Bay Area. Home options range from stately mansions to the clean lines of contemporary styling on spacious properties that are commonly a minimum of one acre.

 

Belmont
Municipal Offices
650-595-7408
www.belmont.gov

Chamber of Commerce
650-595-8696
www.belmontchamber.org

The name Belmont is French for “beautiful mountain,” an apt description for this Peninsula community where prime lots are graced by an abundance of trees, vast canyons, and dramatic wooded hillsides. The city is proud of the Island Park area known as the Belmont Shore, creating a welcoming environment for influential enterprises like world-headquarters offices and posh hotels. Balancing the community is the Harbor Industrial area, providing the right ingredients for economic strength and diversification. The natural bayshore setting is equally ideal for recreational facilities, underlined by the Belmont Sports Complex with its array of activities. Retail merchants enjoy prime locations throughout the city, although many are clustered along the major arteries like Ralston Avenue and El Camino Real. While most residents travel the freeways to destinations throughout the Bay area, passenger rail and bus services are available to connect commuters to San Francisco and San Jose employment centers.

 

Brisbane
Municipal Offices
415-508-2110
www.ci.brisbane.ca.us

Chamber of Commerce
415-467-7283
http://brisbanechamber.org

Nestled against the northeastern slope of Mt. San Bruno in northern San Mateo County, the City of Brisbane is known as a charming small town with a rural flavor surrounded by outstanding metropolitan amenities. The comfortable marine climate avoids the fog so prevalent in San Francisco, creating an idyllic atmosphere for growth and expansion. While residential development is on the rise, the city already claims a significant economic base of manufacturers and services. The local economy blends manufacturing with a number of leading electronics firms and printing companies. In fact, Brisbane has emerged as an employment hub between San Francisco and its international airport along the U.S. Highway 101 corridor, welcoming a considerable daytime population of non-residents. A combination of available land, the award-winning Brisbane Marina, local employment opportunities, and a prime location in the Bay Area are sure to keep Brisbane on the list of growing communities.

 

Burlingame
Municipal Offices
650-558-7200
www.burlingame.org

Chamber of Commerce
650-344-1735
www.burlingamechamber.org

Dubbed the “City of Trees,” Burlingame recreational facilities, lush parks, and sweeping open spaces invite residents to take full advantage of the sun-drenched climate and year-round opportunities for outdoor activity. Nearby Bay, ocean, and mountain sites are appreciated by the many San Francisco commuters who have chosen the city as their residential haven. Employment opportunities within the city continue to expand, mixing international enterprises, nationally known corporations, and independent businesses. Transportation advantages include the close proximity of San Francisco International Airport, Southern Pacific Railroad, and a major north/south artery. A highly developed hospitality sector has opened the door for elegant hotels and conference facilities, inviting the proliferation of wonderful restaurants and shopping districts filled with boutiques and treasures. With its San Francisco Bay location, the city offers panoramic vistas of the Bay, the Burlingame hills, and the magnificent skyline of San Francisco.

 

Colma
Municipal Offices
650-997-8300
www.colma.ca.gov

Chamber of Commerce
650-755-3900
www.dalycity-colmachamber.org

A green-belt community of beautiful historic cemeteries and agricultural gardens, the unique town of Colma encircles a thriving regionally oriented commercial area. The abundance of cemeteries dates back to the turn of the century, when San Francisco’s land scarcity prompted the city to look elsewhere for interments — namely, San Mateo County. Over the decades, businesses and residential developments emerged to form a charming community and modern city infrastructure nestled in the gently rolling hills of the Peninsula. Newcomers will find in Colma a pleasing combination of small-town amenities and services, including restaurants, one of Northern California’s largest auto dealerships, shopping districts, a movie theater, and a first-rate outlet center filled with discounted name-brand merchandise. The expanded amenities in neighboring Daly City make life in this intimate community even more convenient and appealing. The two communities even share a chamber of commerce.

 

Daly City
Municipal Offices
650-991-8000
www.dalycity.org

Chamber of Commerce
650-755-3900
www.dalycity-colmachamber.org

With a growing population base, affordable and high quality housing, and excellent transportation facilities, Daly City offered a desirable suburban residential community that has also evolved into a retail center and incubator for small business. San Francisco International Airport is just nine miles from the City, while Interstate 280 and several other major highways ensure access to regional destinations. Rapid transit serves many of the city’s residents, evidenced by the 18,000 daily passengers served by the BART station alone. Often called the “Gateway to the Peninsula,” the community consistently ranks as one of the county’s largest and most culturally diverse. Approximately one million consumers from around the Bay Area are drawn to sprawling retail centers in the city, from the Mission Street Corridor to sprawling malls like Serramonte Center and Westlake Shopping Center. The renowned Seton Medical Center is a major employer and premier healthcare facility. More reasonably priced housing than most of the Peninsula communities and San Francisco offer is another magnet for newcomers. Beautiful planned developments include the 21-acre Traditions subdivision near Seton Medical Center. The handsome homes in the Pointe Pacific development command 360-degree views in a scenic area surrounded by a preserved habitat for endangered butterflies.

 

East Palo Alto
Municipal Offices
650-853-3100
www.ci.east-palo-alto.ca.us

Chamber of Commerce
650-324-3121
www.paloaltochamber.com

One of the most diverse cities in the entire nation, the city of East Palo Alto has managed to maintain its strong rural heritage and intimate community spirit. African American, Latino, Pacific Islanders, Vietnamese, and Japanese American enclaves are all woven together in the fabric of East Palo Alto — a fact that introduces cultural riches as well as challenges for city planners. Because East Palo Alto has yet to share in the wealth of the high-tech boom that has transformed many of the Bay Area towns within the last decade, government leaders have developed aggressive new programs geared toward preparing area youth for the prolific opportunities that surround them in the fields of computers and electronics. The innovative organization of “Plugged In” is working closely with leading companies to bring computer technology to the entire community. This small, suburban community is centrally located 30 miles south of San Francisco and 25 miles north of San Jose. A long-established, mid-peninsula city consisting of older residential neighborhoods, East Palo Alto offers housing options in a variety of architectural styles and price ranges.

 

Foster City
Municipal Offices
650-286-3200
www.fostercity.org

Chamber of Commerce
650-573-7600
www.fostercitychamber.com

Located on prime land that was first acquired by T. Jack Foster & Sons in 1960, the city of Foster City is one of the nation’s shining examples of a highly successful planned community. Boasting 223 miles of waterways, 13 miles of shoreline, and 12 residential islands, Foster City is home to spectacular waterfront properties and magnificent residential developments as well as luxurious condominiums, townhouses, and apartment complexes. The community enjoys a prime location midway between San Francisco and San Jose, just 10 minutes from the San Francisco International Airport, and adjacent to the San Mateo Bridge serving the East Bay communities. A thriving retail industry includes beautiful shopping centers like Beach Park Plaza, Charter Square, Edge Water Place, Marlin Cove, Market Place, and the Port O’Call. An active parks and recreation department has resulted in first-rate facilities like bike paths, dog exercise areas, vast acres of parkland, lighted athletic fields and tennis courts, picnic areas, par courses, and a wildlife refuge.

 

Half Moon Bay
Municipal Offices
650-726-8270
http://ci.half-moon-bay.ca.us

Chamber of Commerce
650-726-8380
www.halfmoonbaychamber.org

Enjoying a prime location on the coastside of the Peninsula, Half Moon Bay is one of the county’s oldest communities as well as one of the hottest spots for accelerated growth and expansion. Today’s historic business district offers a glimpse of life in the 1800s, when farms dotted the unspoiled countryside. Sandy beaches, lagoons, redwood forests, beautiful state parks, fields of wild flowers, and hiking trails along ocean bluffs are just a few of the natural attractions to this scenic area. Local activities include award-winning golf courses, sport fishing, whale watching, beach horseback riding, historical district shopping, lush wineries, redwood preserves, bird refuges, bluff and mountain hiking, acres of field flowers, a state nature preserve, Fitzgerald Marine Reserve in Montara, Princeton Harbor, and Maverick’s — world famous for surfing. Hospitality and tourism are thriving industries in Half Moon Bay and other coastal communities, dotted with country stores, bakeries, galleries, art studios, boutiques, spas, restaurants, hotels, and charming bed-and-breakfasts. Housing choices range from meticulously restored older homes to luxurious new construction. Among the distinctive unincorporated communities that punctuate the coastline are Pescadero with its New England styling and Princeton-by-the-Sea, a haven for commercial fishermen and recreational boaters. Writers and artists are drawn to Montara. Moss Beach, El Granada, Miramar, San Gregorio, and La Honda are other charming coastal communities.

 

Hillsborough
Municipal Offices
650-375-7400
www.hillsborough.net

Chamber of Commerce
650-344-1735
www.burlingamechamber.org

Drawing residents that are primarily business executives and professionals, Hillsborough was originally developed as a residential haven for San Francisco’s upper echelon who desired a more relaxed and rural living environment. By the World War II era, most of the sprawling original estates had been parceled into smaller lots — still generous acreage by San Francisco standards. Residents have staunchly fought to preserve the residential nature of their home, in spite of the area’s magnetism for major developments like a hospital or a $315 million research center. Zoning laws have been consistently and rigidly enforced to offer newcomers the serenity and residential haven that attracted the first residents. Since the ’30s, the minimum lot size has remained a half-acre with a minimum frontage of 150 feet. Beyond the tranquility and natural beauty, one of the primary attractions to Hillsborough is an outstanding school system that has been recognized on every level for excellence in education.

 

Menlo Park
Municipal Offices
650-330-6600
www.menlopark.org

Chamber of Commerce
650-325-2818
www.menloparkchamber.com

Harmonizing the romantic history of another century with valuable contributions to modern technology, Menlo Park is a delightful blend of the old and new. In fact, the chamber of commerce selected a home in the 1867 Menlo Park Train Station, distinguished as the oldest station building in continuous use. However, even the celebrated architecture and antiques from yesterday are meticulously maintained in this exceptionally beautiful community. Located about 30 miles from San Francisco, Menlo Park is approximately 20 miles from San Jose and 30 miles from the Pacific Ocean. Known as the “City of Parks,” the community maintains lush parkland in a 20-mile radius offers opportunities for tennis, softball, soccer, archery, swimming, camping, softball, basketball, lawn bowling, hiking, and picnicking. Primarily a city of handsome homes and luxurious condominiums, the community’s proximity to Stanford University has resulted in a proliferation of impressive light industry and high-tech facilities that include the Nobel-Prize-winning research center of Stanford Linear Accelerator.

 

Millbrae
Municipal Offices
650-259-2334
www.ci.millbrae.ca.us

Chamber of Commerce
650-697-7324
www.millbrae.com

Adjacent to the San Francisco International Airport, Millbrae is cradled in the sun-drenched hills that separate the Pacific Ocean from the San Francisco Bay. Major freeways border the eastern and western boundaries, creating easy access to every corner of the Bay Area. Well-kept middle-class neighborhoods mirror the pride of residents who prefer small-town living to the urban rush of a large metropolis. Although branch offices of leading financial institutions are at home in Millbrae, the city thrives on small business for its economic vitality. Merchants know and greet their customers, offering the warmth and personal attention of yesterday in a modern world dominated by electronics and computers. Many of the hillside homes enjoy spectacular Bay vistas, although the spacious green space of parks and the local country club create a lush backdrop for adobe-tiled Spanish style homes or restored Victorians. Named for a Scottish word meaning “rolling meadowland,” the panoramic community of Millbrae is known as “The Place in the Sun.”

 

Pacifica
Municipal Offices
650-738-7300
www.cityofpacifica.org

Chamber of Commerce
650-355-4122
www.pacificachamber.com

Stretching down the Pacific Coast, the City of Pacifica appears to bisect the seemingly endless sea with its spindly pier and jutting rocks of Piedro Point. Consisting of several small residential communities, the city is undeniably one of California’s most scenic coastline treasures. Just 15 minutes from San Francisco, the city has managed to retain its “island” atmosphere. Many homes are nestled along the verdant hillsides, offering spectacular views of golden sunsets over the glistening ocean. The city’s business community is experiencing a boom, driven primarily by San Francisco businesses and executives who are seeking a tranquil haven at a distance from the rush of urban life. Consisting of several small residential communities and scattered single homes, the housing options range from modest single-family homes to a scattering of luxurious estates. Residents span all age groups, income levels, and career choices, drawn together by a closely knit community spirit and their mutual love of this oceanside paradise. The climate is often cool, subdued by morning mists that may linger throughout the day.

 

Portola Valley
Municipal Offices
650-851-1701
www.portolavalley.net

Chamber of Commerce
650-324-3121
www.paloaltochamber.com

Ranked among the nation’s wealthiest towns and cited by American Demographics as one of the “smartest” in terms of higher education attainment, Portola Valley is nestled in a verdant and golden glen. Development has been much slower here than that experienced by most Bay Area communities, allowing the town to preserve the same rustic atmosphere that made it so appealing to large landowners from San Francisco who arrived decades ago. Secluded within the valley are the natural treasures of rolling hills, fresh air, the serenade of birds, and sprawling open space. During the expansion that followed World War II, residents were determined to protect the charm and grandeur of their home. Concerted efforts were made to maintain low density housing, protect the valley’s natural beauty, and balance the development of estates and ranch-style homes with a pastoral atmosphere. Most newcomers to the area would agree that these objectives have been admirably met. Portola Valley continues to support its environmental and historic heritage, excellent public schools, and a town government that includes a multitude of generous volunteers.

 

Redwood City
Municipal Offices
650-780-7000
www.redwoodcity.org

Chamber of Commerce
650-364-1722
https://redwoodcitychamber.com/

Located 25 miles south of San Francisco, the well-balanced community of Redwood City serves as the county seat and ranks among the most densely populated of San Mateo County’s urban centers. Incorporated in the mid 1860s, Redwood City is a long-established community that manages to harmonize residential, industrial, and commercial elements into a pleasing cityscape. Its waterfront provides a yacht harbor and the only deep-water port in the South Bay, distinguished as the fastest-growing small bulk port in the state. In addition to its flourishing trade industry, the city is home to major medical centers and a number of leading corporations that include computer and Internet companies as “Silicon Valley” sprawls north. A well-developed and highly organized parks and recreation department oversees nearly two dozen parks and community centers that offer such facilities as sports fields, swimming pools, tennis courts, playgrounds, athletic leagues, fitness centers, and programs for all ages. Housing options in Redwood City range from vintage older homes to the most luxurious of new construction with superb Bay views.

 

San Bruno
Municipal Offices
650-616-7058
www.sanbruno.ca.gov

Chamber of Commerce
650-588-0180
www.sanbrunochamber.com

Culturally diverse, the City of San Bruno is ideally located just 12 miles south of San Francisco and immediately adjacent to San Francisco International Airport. Situated along Highway 101 and Interstate 280, the community offers its residents easy access to the superb cultural, educational, and recreational opportunities in the Bay Area. The city has managed to preserve its friendly, small-town atmosphere in close proximity to one of the world’s leading metropolitan centers. San Bruno highlights include thriving companies, Skyline Community College, National Archives Pacific Sierra Region, regional shopping centers, and a quaint downtown district with an international flavor. The premier site among the more than 20 parks that make up the recreational network is City Park, where residents enjoy a gym, walking paths, tennis courts, swimming pool, teen center, and sports and athletic facilities. Good schools, wonderful retail opportunities, beautiful homes, and a vibrant local economy contribute to San Bruno’s desirability as residential retreat within the bustling Bay Area.

 

San Carlos
Municipal Offices
650-802-4219
www.cityofsancarlos.org

Chamber of Commerce
650-593-1068
www.sancarloschamber.org

“The City of Good Living” is centrally located in the heart of the Peninsula, just 25 miles south of San Francisco. San Carlos is characterized as an appealing, charming town with an enviable sense of community and a thriving downtown district that draws neighbors together from daytime to evening. A thriving industrial area on the east side of town is home to large and small businesses that have been attracted by a supportive local government and premier transportation facilities. Accessible by commuter train or bus, private car, and private plane via the San Carlos Airport, the city also claims a well-developed hospitality sector that features intimate hotels, superb restaurants, a bevy of specialty shops, and two unique museums. The Hiller Aviation Museum serves as a regional attraction, exploring the past century of flight with overhead displays of full-seize replicas, restorations, and models of flying machines. Nearby community colleges, nationally acclaimed universities, and San Francisco’s world-class cultural treasures and retail districts combine to make life in San Carlos the best of all worlds.

 

San Mateo
Municipal Offices
650-522-7000
www.cityofsanmateo.org

Chamber of Commerce
650-401-2440
http://sanmateochamber.org

Consistently ranking among the county’s most densely populated cities, San Mateo enjoys a centralized location that forms an urban bridge between the Peninsula, the East Bay, and San Francisco International Airport — just five miles away. A community of good schools, attractive neighborhoods, outstanding libraries, and well-equipped parks, San Mateo takes pride in its reputation as a prime location for business and residential development. Newly remodeled shopping centers combine with financial and commercial centers to meet the needs for retail goods and convenient services. Facilities like the College of San Mateo and the San Mateo County Expo Center, home of the county fair and other major events, also serve the entire region. Housing options offer a great deal of variety in style and price range, blending stately older homes with the clean lines of modern condominiums and townhouses. Property can vary from quiet, tree-lined streets in the heart of the city to hillside view lots or spectacular waterfront properties. An abundance of green space and playgrounds, a golf course, yacht harbor, and beaches crown the city with natural beauty and exceptional California-style recreational amenities.

 

South San Francisco
Municipal Offices
650-877-8500
www.ssf.net

Chamber of Commerce
650-588-1911
www.ssfchamber.com

The home of San Francisco International Airport, the city of South San Francisco, is often credited as the birthplace of the biotechnology industry. Since the 1970s when Genentech became the first company to commercially apply recombinant DNA technology, the industry has grown in South San Francisco as steadily and intensely as any location in the world. In the face of this growth and expansion, the economic base has diversified to encompass a wide spectrum of related businesses and supportive scientific enterprises. The city’s coastal location and attractive housing options have enhanced residential growth as well, drawing newcomers to the balmy climate, lush parks, and easy access to the San Francisco Bay for premier marinas, water sports, and boating activities. 3Com Park and professional sports thrills are just 10 minutes from home, while the bright lights and world-class amenities of San Francisco are only 15 minutes away. Those who desire all the cosmopolitan advantages of San Francisco within the context of a less hectic pace may find South San Francisco to be the ideal residential choice.

 

Woodside
Municipal Offices
650-851-6790
www.woodsidetown.org

Chamber of Commerce
650-364-1722
https://redwoodcitychamber.com/

Few locales in the nation can boast a one horse for every five residents, but such is the claim of Woodside. Both the residents and the city government are attuned to preserving the rustic nature and charming ambiance of their small town in spite of its proximity to pulsating cosmopolitan centers like Palo Alto, San Jose, and San Francisco. Just 30 miles south of San Francisco, Woodside is more than an equestrian’s dream. The town offers a tranquil residential retreat with a rural flavor that holds appeal for young professionals, retirees, and families. Beautiful homes of varied architectural styles and price ranges combine with a scattering of local retail and service establishments for a convenient yet secluded lifestyle. Sweeping lawns and rolling pastures are often graced by winding roads lined with large eucalyptus, redwood, and oak trees. Nestled against the eastern slopes of the Santa Cruz Mountains, Woodside offers country living at its finest in close proximity to major transportation arteries and the world-class amenities of San Francisco.

 

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