SOUTH SHORE

Often called “The Land of Pilgrims and Presidents,” the South Shore is an inviting region that encompasses distinctive towns, beautiful beaches, scenic harbors and bays, historic homes, and fascinating museums. The peaceful communities that punctuate the area have long attracted those who enjoy the sound of sea gulls in the early morning or the feeling of saltwater mist and ocean breezes. The South Shore is a haven for anyone who appreciates the picturesque charm and distinctive beauty of quintessential “New England.”

Just outside of Boston at the edge of the South Shore communities lies Quincy, home of two United States Presidents: John Adams and his son John Quincy Adams. The delightful town of Hingham is next on the winding path, showcasing lavish 18th and 19th century homes as well as the Old Ship Church—the nation’s oldest wooden church in continuous use. Along the Hull Peninsula is the nation’s oldest lighthouse. Also in this panoramic coastal region is the original American “hometown” of Plymouth, where the Mayflower passengers first stepped ashore in 1620.

Although a significant number of population centers along the South Shore are bedroom communities for Boston, Quincy and Braintree in particular provide local employment opportunities and a pleasing, progressive environment where trade, finance, insurance, and services have taken root and flourished. Marshfield represents another rapidly developing town in terms of commercial development and overall residential growth.

Vestiges of the area’s economic heritage of harbor trade activity, agriculture, fishing, and shipbuilding are still evident today. Enhanced by the proliferation of outstanding historical sites, tourism plays a leading role along the South Shore. Lovely harbors, yacht clubs, charter boats, pristine beaches, oceanfront vistas, vacation properties, elaborate shopping districts, first-rate restaurants, and quaint inns combine to make the South Shore a desirable destination.

 

Services
In keeping with the overall excellence of the Greater Boston area, the South Shore communities offer outstanding educational opportunities. Programs for both challenged and gifted students are prolific, including enrichment programs, summer workshops, advanced placement courses, and challenging classes for the academically talented. Vocational-technical training options are widely available for residents of all ages, and working adults will find an extensive array of evening classes for continuing education or launching a new career. Few areas in the nation can rival the South Shore for the rich diversity of colleges and universities.  Whether the goal is earning a two-year degree from a community college or graduating from Harvard University, the potential for higher education within an easy commute is virtually unlimited. South Shore institutions include Stonehill College in Easton, Wheaton College in Norton, and a Massachusetts State College in Bridgewater.

South Shore Hospital is a not-for-profit, tax-exempt, regional provider of acute, outpatient, home health and hospice care for the southeastern region of Massachusetts. This outstanding institution was the first hospital in Massachusetts to have earned three consecutive maximum accreditations with commendation from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Centrally located in this region, South Shore Hospital combines with an entire network of skill professionals in private practice, emergency centers, and specialized facilities to meet every need from routine to advanced.

Interstate 95 and Route 128 serve the area as major thoroughfares, although many of the communities enjoy MBTA bus and rail service to key metropolitan points. Route 3 also provides a connection to Interstate 93 and Route 128, and Route 3A traverses a path that parallels the shoreline. Interstate 95 is especially advantageous, since it forms the “loop” around Greater Boston and offers connections to a myriad of other highways.

 

Lifestyle
Quiet residential neighborhoods, sprawling suburban towns, and quaint seashore villages offer newcomers to the South Shore a diverse selection of environments and lifestyles. Former fishing ports, whaling centers, mill towns and industrial cities are experiencing considerable growth and revitalization as in influx of new year-round residents deepen in their appreciation of the area’s traditional values and sheer New England charm.

Large beaches, stately oceanfront mansions, handsome condominiums, antique homes, summer cottages, and modest bungalows are just a few of the housing options. Luxurious suburban developments and modern industrial parks contrast with primarily rural areas where strict zoning laws guarantee the preservation of open space and a genuine “country” feeling.

Although the Atlantic Ocean provides the premier natural playground for the area, a myriad of well-organized and well-supported activities and facilities are available within each community. Involvement in civic organizations is strong in many of the smaller towns, where families with generational roots in the community blend with enthusiastic newcomers. America’s original hometown of Plymouth features unique historic sites including a vivid re-creation of 17th-century American life. Whale-watching excursions and cruises to Provincetown on Cape Cod both depart from Plymouth. Nearby is 14,000-acre Myles Standish State Park, an ideal destination for camping, swimming, picnicking, biking, and jogging.

Steeped in historic significance, the South Shore is home to a number of excellent museums and cultural attractions. The Art Complex Museum in Duxbury—set in park-like grounds ideal for strolling—specializes in American artists and furniture. The Fuller Museum of Art in Brockton enjoys a lush, 700-acre environment of woods, ponds and gardens. The town of Cohasset boasts a number of well-known and popular cultural attractions. At the harbor, residents can enjoy Bassing’s Beach, the Sailing Club, and the Yacht Club. Marshfield, with its bright green wetlands, is known for its spectacular natural beauty. The Marshfield Fair, held in August, is one of the oldest and best in the state.

South Shore residents can look forward to every possible luxury close to home. Premier shopping areas, tempting restaurants, charming cafes, and local venues for the performing arts are scattered throughout the region. Antique collectors can spend the weekend browsing through the special shops and galleries that line the quaint shipping district. Those who enjoy the stimulating atmosphere of a modern mall will want to visit the retail centers in Braintree. While these communities boast many of the amenities offers by other resort towns, they tend to be less frequented by throngs of visitors. Newcomers who are seeking al the charm of a quaint but serene coastal town will discover the ideal home in one of these welcoming South Shore communities.

 

Abington
City Hall
781-982-2112
www.abingtonma.gov

Abington is located 12 miles south of Boston.  The town was famous as part of the shoe and boot industry during the early parts of the last century. Today the town is primarily residential in character, though several businesses flourish within the borders of this quiet town. The town was founded in 1712 and today retains a great deal of that historic charm, open space and a rural feeling.  There are several parks and recreation facilities available to residents, including a municipal golf course. There is strong town pride among the residents as well as active civic organizations.

 

Acushnet
Town Hall
508-998-0200
www.acushnet.ma.us

Originally an agricultural community embracing the headwaters of the Acushnet River, the residential town of Acushnet has retained its rural atmosphere, while also providing a home for various industries. Through the 1800s, the town was the site of water-powered factories and boat yards; in the 1990s, the town hosted construction, manufacturing and agriculture/aquaculture industries. It is the original home of the Titleist golf ball company. Acushnet is a quiet friendly community with a population of over 10,600 residents, with many miles of winding, country roads. Residents take great pride in the town’s schools, openness, and feeling of family. Each Fall, during the well-known Apple/Peach Festival, Acushnet’s growers, artisans, and Historical Society welcome visitors from far and wide.

 

Berkley
Town Hall
508-822-3348
http://townofberkleyma.com

The Town of Berkley was established April 18, 1735, and named for George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloynes, Ireland. Berkley is bordered north by Taunton, east by Lakeville, south by Freetown and west by the Taunton River. The notably stony soil of Berkley did not discourage the early settlers of the community who did some shipbuilding but essentially concentrated on agriculture.  The town is still rural in character, and has retained much of its 18th century landscape.  Still a small, rural community, Berkley is well loved by its residents for its peacefulness and its reminders of the past, among which is the Berkley-Dighton Bridge, possibly the oldest swing span bridge in the state.

 

Braintree
Municipal Offices
781-794-8000
www.townofbraintreegov.org
Chamber of Commerce
781-421-3900
www.southshorechamber.com

Enjoying close proximity to Boston on the Southeast Expressway, Braintree is a rapidly growing suburb. The community is distinguished for its extensive recreational programs for children, an abundance of attractive housing, good schools, and expansive retail activity. Recreational amenities include a golf course, local parks, and Sunset Lake; although Braintree’s waterfronts are open exclusively to residents and their escorted guests. Organized programs for the youth in the summertime are exceptional, from sailing lessons and horsemanship to a junior golf clinic. South Shore Plaza is a regional shopping destination, offering hundreds of stores, shops, restaurants, eateries, and attractions. The community is also home to respected private schools and Massachusetts Respiratory Hospital.

 

Carver
Municipal Offices
508-866-3400
www.carverma.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-947-1499
www.cranberrycountry.org

Scenic and primarily rural, Carver is graded by three rivers, numerous brooks, lazy ponds, sizable swamps, and towering pines. While Carver is characterized as one of Boston’s many suburban commuter communities, widespread cranberry bogs attest to the area’s strong agricultural roots. In the 1940s, the Town of Carver produced more cranberries than any locale in the world. Despite dramatic population increases, the cranberry bogs still play a vital role in the local economy. Along with forested land and scenic wetlands, the bogs contribute to the preservation of a “country” feeling. Handsome historic mansions reflect the riches from yesterday’s bustling iron foundries. Agricultural activity and heavily forested land combine for a beautiful, open setting. Local campgrounds include hiking, biking, picnicking, and swimming areas.

 

Cohasset
Municipal Offices
781-383-4100
www.cohassetma.org

Chamber of Commerce
781-383-1010
www.cohassetchamber.org

Smaller and more intimate than many of the nearby South Shore towns, Cohasset is a beautiful, picturesque residential haven with a strong cultural community. Slow growth has enabled the community to retain its original charm and character over the decades. A number of antique homes, churches, and other public buildings blend harmoniously with the classic “New England” town common. Although handsome and stately older homes are available, newer construction offers a diversity of architectural styles. Transportation amenities are excellent, with good bus service to Boston and access to Quincy rapid transit. Commuter boat from Hingham to Boston is another option. Residents of Cohasset enjoy excellent recreational facilities that include playgrounds, tennis courts, ball fields, several ponds, beaches and conservation areas for hiking. Harborside Park is home to a boat dock, lighted outdoor ice-skating rink, and a yacht club.

 

Dartmouth
Town Hall
508-910-1813
www.town.dartmouth.ma.us

Dartmouth has remained through most of its history a rural agricultural community but began adopting a summer residential and resort character in the 19th century as wealthy and near-wealthy city dwellers from New Bedford built and purchased vacation homes.  The Community is the home to the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, a four year institution with numerous colleges of study and the Southern New England School of Law.  Although Dartmouth is now primarily a suburban bedroom community, the town came into the 20th century with significant portions of its historic character intact; there is still farming in Dartmouth, and there is still a strong vacation component. The construction of Southern Massachusetts University in the 1960’s accelerated the town’s growth in residential development. Areas of Dartmouth are rich in colonial, Federal and Greek revival architecture and some rural areas are left, although under pressure from housing development.  Residents are proud of the fact that in Dartmouth the past and present co-exist: the past in its farms, churches, villages and   scenic rural roads and the present in Route 6 commercial development, the North Dartmouth Mall and emerging industrial policies.

 

Dighton
Town Hall
508-669-6431
www.dighton-ma.gov

Dighton, the geographic center of Bristol County, is also a rural economic center.  It is the location of the Bristol County Agricultural High School and of the Dighton-Rehoboth Regional High School.  It is a mixture of suburban and rural settings with a strong industrial presence. Dighton has a full array of activities and services for its young people, including little league baseball, soccer, basketball, softball and tennis. The town offers an excellent educational delivery system from its regional K-12 school district. Dighton, which was named in honor of a woman, Frances Dighton Williams, was founded in 1712 as the southern precinct of the Town of Taunton and retains close regional ties with Fall River, Providence Rhode Island and Taunton.

 

Duxbury
Municipal Offices
781-934-1100
www.town.duxbury.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-830-1620
www.plymouthchamber.com

In a class of its own for the quality and quantity of antique homes, Duxbury is a lovely residential community with the added prestige of an oceanside setting. Charming older homes are sometimes on the market, although newer construction in a variety of pleasing architectural styles is more readily available. With its ocean setting, Duxbury offers many recreational sites that are water-oriented including a yacht club, ocean beaches, town dock, and boating facilities. Other popular pastimes include golf, tennis and ice skating. Numerous civic, social, cultural and athletic organizations create a welcoming atmosphere. Local conveniences include ample retail development and a variety of skilled professionals to meet routine healthcare needs. Good schools combine with nearby opportunities for higher education in public and private colleges and universities.

 

Fairhaven
Town Hall
508-979-4023
www.fairhaven-ma.gov

Fairhaven is a quaint seaside fishing and resort community on the shore of Buzzards Bay, directly across the harbor from the famed whaling port of New Bedford. The area that makes up Fairhaven was purchased from Wampanoag Chief Massasoit in 1652 by a group of colonists from Plymouth. Settlement began about 1659. Among the earliest settlers were John Cooke, one of the original Mayflower Pilgrims, and his cousin Jonathan Delano, and ancestor of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Fairhaven has a rich history dating back to the days of the Pilgrims. The first naval battle of the American Revolution was fought by Fairhaven militiamen aboard the sloop Success in May of 1775. The town withstood an attack by the British in 1778 and grew in prosperity during the whaling days in the 1800s. The town’s most remarkable features are the magnificent European-style public buildings built between 1885 and 1906 by Standard Oil Company millionaire Henry Huttleston Rogers, a native of the town. Residents enjoy a public state beach overlooking Buzzards Bay, several recreational marinas, historical Fort Phoenix and the Rogers buildings, a number of unique shops and more than fifty restaurants.

 

Fall River
City Hall
508-324-2220
www.fallriverma.org

The City of Fall River is an industrial community on the banks of the Taunton River in Bristol County with a long and fascinating history. The city maintains a highly diversified industrial profile with chemical operations, electrical and food products along with the garment and textile industries. Tourism is a major industry in the area as well, with the largest factory outlet district in New England and a World War II memorial, Battleship Cove, the world’s largest collection of World War II naval vessels which opens a variety of American warships to visitors at the State Pier in Fall River. The city retains a variety of handsome historic public buildings. Located along the eastern shore of Mount Hope Bay at the mouth of the Taunton River, the City became famous during the 19th century as the leading textile manufacturing center in the United States. While the textile industry has long since moved on, its impact on the City’s culture and landscape remains to this day. Fall River’s official motto is “We’ll Try”, dating back to the aftermath of the Great Fire of 1843. It is nicknamed “The Scholarship City”, because Dr. Irving Fradkin founded Dollars for Scholars here in 1958.

Freetown
Town Hall
508-644-2201
www.freetownma.gov

Freetown is one of the oldest communities in the United States, having been settled by the Pilgrims and their descendants in the latter half of the 17th century. The town once included the city of Fall River (1659–1803), and a portion of Acushnet (1659–1815). The town celebrated its tricentennial in 1983. Freetown is currently divided into two villages, which historically developed almost entirely independent from one another: Assonet and East Freetown. The Town of Freetown is a pastoral community in Bristol County with a small summer colony and a maritime history. The town’s early economy was based mostly on agriculture, but the water power of the Assonet River eventually brought grist, saw and fulling mills after 1695 and in the 18th century the town’s industries included a tannery. While culture in Freetown as a whole has developed mostly over the last twenty years, both villages in town have strong cultural histories. There are a number of major, annual events such as the Strawberry Festival, held every Father’s Day and sponsored by the Tuesday Club of Assonet and several events during the Fourth of July, including a parade and a fireworks display over the Assonet River. Many of Freetown’s sites of interest are derived from its strong history. The Freetown Historical Society Museum in Assonet is a trove of artifacts and information relating to the history of the town and surrounding area, and has an extensive genealogical library. Several buildings on the property show visitors how life in Freetown once was, even a mere sixty years ago, with a one-room schoolhouse, small chapel, blacksmith shop, and the like.

 

Hanover
Municipal Offices
781-826-5000
www.hanover-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
781-826-8865
http://hanovermachamber.com

Appealing as a semi-rural suburb, the Town of Hanover offers exceptionally well-developed commercial districts that include three shopping areas and one large, enclosed mall. The pride of Hanover is the charming Four Corners section, an area that retains its authentic period village character. Hanover is distinguished as a community of quiet residential neighborhoods, beautiful landscaping, tree-lined streets, and a selection of fine homes. Conservation land is ideal for hiking and horseback riding; while a wildlife sanctuary offers skiing, hiking, and picnicking. Despite recent growth, the nearby rural suburb of Pembroke still offers undeveloped land and beautiful open space. Much of this pastoral atmosphere is a result of agricultural activity. The picturesque town center showcases a collection of well-preserved historic buildings. The bustling commercial district offers the daily convenience of retail stores, services, a library, and community center. Forested land for hiking, jogging and nature observation combines with facilities for freshwater and pool swimming, sports fields, boating areas, archery, and tennis.

 

Hanson
Town Hall
781-293-5186
www.hanson-ma.gov

Hanson is considered one of the inland towns of Massachusetts’s South Shore, and is bordered by Rockland and Hanover to the north, Pembroke to the east, Halifax to the south, East Bridgewater to the west, and Whitman to the northwest. Hanson is located approximately nine miles east of Brockton, thirteen miles south of Quincy, and eighteen miles south-southeast of Boston, making it a great location for commuters. Hanson offers a mix of modern culture and historic living. Residents will find everything from shopping malls to riding stables.  Hanson is a small residential community with many lakes, ponds, and New England style homes. Residents in this quiet and peaceful town can enjoy several outdoor activities at Camp Kiwanee and area ponds. The community has maintained its small town charm over the years, yet has easily inter-mixed the conveniences of day-to-day living, light industry, and technology.  The city has preserved open space and woodlands, and most homeowners enjoy sizable lots, adding to the spacious feel of the community. Hanson is within easy commuting range of the educational institutions in the Boston/Cambridge area. Many of New England’s colleges and universities are within short driving range.

 

Hingham
Municipal Offices
781-741-1411
www.hingham-ma.com

Chamber of Commerce
781-421-3900
www.southshorechamber.com

Commuters to Boston have been drawn to Hingham, with its scenic harbor and pleasing blend of the old and new. This seashore town is close enough to the ‘big city” offer views of the spectacular Boston skyline, and yet far enough removed to include an 18-miles shoreline and a 250-acre reservation among its many amenities. Other facilities include an indoor hockey rink, riding stables, and a country club. The Wompatuck State Park adds another expanse of beautiful open space for recreation and relaxation. Some of Hingham’s homes are older antique residences that date back to colonial days, and the town also offers a good blend of well-kept vintage homes and newer construction in a variety of styles. The shining jewel of local cultural attractions is the South Shore Conservatory of Arts & Music.

 

Hull
Municipal Offices
781-925-2000
www.town.hull.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
781-925-9980
www.hullchamber.com

Situated on an irregularly shaped peninsula that juts into the Massachusetts Bay, Hull offers a panoramic coastline and magnificent beaches crowned by an amusement park. Although this community began as a popular summer resort area for many decades, it has evolved into a year-round residential haven for a significant number of Boston commuters who have converted many of the vacation cottages and homes into comfortable and permanent residences. More than 12,000 people now call Hull their year-round home—although the population doubles during the summer months. In addition to renovated residences, Hull offers a selection of beautiful oceanfront homes and modern condominiums. Nantasket Beach is a popular choice for swimming and water sports. Bus service to Boston is available in nearby Hingham, although daily commuter boat is also an option.

 

Kingston
Municipal Offices
781-585-0500
www.kingstonmass.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-830-1620
www.plymouthchamber.com

This quaint historic town near Plymouth is distinguished as the home of Governor William Bradford and also the site of the oldest continuously operating shipyard in the nation, the birthplace of the Independence. Many residents are employed outside this peaceful community, since Route 3 and 3A provide quick access to Boston. Nearby Kingston features a number of elegant antique residences as well as a variety of newer homes. In addition to a beautiful town beach, residents can enjoy 200 acres of recreational land and a 50-acre pond for swimming and fishing. An abundance of fine restaurants, entertainment venues, vast industrial parks, cultural attractions, major shopping facilities, medical resources, and Quincy rapid transit are all just a short drive from home.

 

Marion
Municipal Offices
508-748-3500
www.marionma.gov

Marion is a delightful residential town, felt by its residents to have rare natural beauty and charm. The small town character, blended with the flavor and benefits of a seacoast community with lovely residential neighborhoods and modern conveniences, makes Marion an ideal town for year round living. Recreation opportunities are plentiful and Sippican Harbor hosts a variety of waterfront programs, including swimming at the town beaches, pleasure boating and fishing. There are golf courses and indoor and outdoor tennis courts, while Tabor Academy periodically opens up its hockey rink to the public

 

Marshfield
Municipal Offices
781-536-2500
www.townofmarshfield.org

Chamber of Commerce
781-421-3900
www.southshorechamber.com

The neighboring communities of Scituate and Marshfield share the natural boundary of the North River, and both played an important role in the maritime history of the nation. Although Marshfield first attracted farmers to its fertile marshlands in the 1600s, its strategic location near the ocean soon spurred the genesis of the shipbuilding industry. Many of New England’s most famous ships and clippers were constructed at this location. A significant number of handsome homes that were constructed during this illustrious and affluent period still stand today, enhancing the quaint oceanside atmosphere. An abundance of open space is one of the town’s most appealing qualities. Miles of sandy beaches, the Cornhill Woodland, Cherry Hill, and Slaughter’s Reservation are all ideal spots for hiking, nature study, and bird watching. Golf and tennis are other popular pastimes.

 

Mattapoisett
Town Offices
508-758-4100
www.mattapoisett.net

Mattapoisett is a pleasant New England coastal town, with a large harbor on Buzzard”s Bay. Covering an area of 17.5 square miles, the town offers a wide range of living conditions varying from waterfront residences and colonial village homes to unique suburban developments and farm residences. Mattapoisett was settled in 1750 and officially incorporated in 1857. Originally a part of Rochester, the area had most likely been visited by European traders and sailors. There is also evidence of prior Wampanoag Indian settlements, including burial grounds, throughout the town. In fact, the word Mattapoisett is Wampanoag for “a place of resting.” Today, the town is largely a suburban community, with most residents commuting to jobs in greater New Bedford, Providence or Boston, or operating businesses targeting summer tourism. The Mattapoisett River begins in Rochester and flows through town, emptying into Mattapoisett Harbor, an arm of Buzzards Bay. Mattapoisett is home to Haskell Swamp in the Tinkham Hill area in the northern part of town. There is also a state-managed wildlife area, commonly known as Nunes Farm, along the waterfront near the Fairhaven line. There are four beaches and two parks along the waterfront, as well as Ned Point Light which was built in 1837 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1987.

 

New Bedford
City Hall
508-979-1450
www.newbedford-ma.gov

With a population of approximately 100,000, the City of New Bedford is the world’s most famous whaling era seaport and the number one fishing port in America. This city is a wonderfully diverse, culturally rich community with a proud present, past and future.  Children can obtain a high quality education in the New Bedford Public Schools System. Individuals pursuing a higher education can do so at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth or Bristol Community College, both conveniently offer a downtown New Bedford campus. New Bedford is dotted with beautifully maintained parks and public beaches. Neighborhood restaurants, cafés and bistros feature delicious ethnic cuisines. The city is also home to the Whaling National Historic Park, Whaling Museum, unique shops and galleries in the downtown historic district. New Bedford offers an unbeatable quality of life and is a great place to live, work, and raise a family.

 

Norwell
Municipal Offices
781-659-8072
www.townofnorwell.net

Chamber of Commerce
508-586-0500
www.metrosouthchamber.com

This comfortable, rural South Shore community is a town of rolling country hills and beautiful old shade trees that grace fine old colonial residences. Located less than three miles from the coast of the historic North River, Norwell has carefully protected its rural atmosphere with stringent zoning regulations. New construction is required to include a minimum of one acre of property, ensuring the preservation of open space and the natural charm of this scenic New England community. With its pristine atmosphere, Norwell attracts many affluent professionals and horse lovers. Outdoor enthusiasts can participate in swimming, canoeing, cross-country skiing, and other activities sponsored by the recreation commission.

 

Pembroke
Town Offices
781-709-1400
www.townofpembrokemass.org

The Town of Pembroke is a rural community located approximately 30 miles  South of Boston.  The town is a convenient commute to Boston to the north and historic Plymouth to the south.  With five ponds, Pembroke is able to offer swimming, boating and fishing in the summer and ice fishing and skating in the winter months to residents and visitors. Approaching Pembroke, visitors pass the herring run and the park, a site which brings people from surrounding areas. Pembroke’s town center is that of a typical New England town with many well-preserved historic buildings, picturesque and unique to the northeast. Residents comment that if you live in Pembroke and work elsewhere, you are always happy to come home.

 

Plymouth
Municipal Offices
508-747-1620
www.plymouth-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
508-830-1620
www.plymouthchamber.com

Revered as the “oldest town in the nation,” Plymouth is a community that easily blends history with modern day living. The most historic town in Massachusetts, it also claims active industrial complexes that provide employment to local and regional residents. Extensive shopping facilities, a local hospital, and well-developed civic organizations add to the contemporary appeal. Plymouth’s scenic waterfront, historic significance, miles of beaches, and open spaces also attract many visitors. All types of architectural styles can be found in Plymouth homes, from stately 18th-century colonials and sprawling farmhouses to modern ranch style houses, apartments, and condominiums. Morton Park invites swimming, relaxation, picnicking, and boating. Other exceptional amenities include golf courses, tennis courts, an ice-skating rink, town harbor, docks, children’s playground, a state forest, and Plymouth & White Horse Beaches.

Plympton
Town Hall
781-585-3220
www.town.plympton.ma.us

Newcomers to the small town of Plympton will feel as if they have entered a simpler, quieter time in history. Rustic, 200-year-old farmhouses blend with homes in a variety of architectural styles that have been constructed over the past three decades. A small commercial “main street” district lines Route 58. Retail activity is limited to necessary conveniences and centers around the local restaurant, bank, gas station and farm stand with its colorful array of garden-fresh produce. Plympton offers its residents a high quality of life in a sall town setting, with all of the amenities of Boston a short drive away.

 

Quincy
Municipal Offices
617-376-1000
www.quincyma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
781-421-3900
www.southshorechamber.com

Just ten miles south of Boston is the appealing suburb of Quincy, boasting many attractive residential areas. Some of these neighborhoods are ideally situated to take advantage of the views and recreational opportunities afforded by 27 miles of picturesque shoreline. Quincy is the leading city of the South Shore area, and also known as the City of Presidents. The second and sixth U.S. presidents, John Adams and his son John Quincy Adams, were both born here. The two birthplace homes are the oldest presidential birthplaces in the nation. Although Quincy is popular with commuters because of its convenient Red Line subway connection to Boston, this thriving community offers residents a significant amount of commercial development. Quincy is one suburb where employment opportunities can be found close to home. The area is also known for its excellent schools and efficient social services.

 

Randolph
Municipal Offices
781-961-0911
www.townofrandolph.com

Chamber of Commerce
781-421-3900
www.southshorechamber.com

A thriving community with a robust economy, Randolph has experienced rapid growth and expansion over the past few years. Strategically located in close proximity to a number of key highways including Route 128 and Interstate 3495, Randolph has been dubbed “The Hub of the South Shore.” With its transportation efficiencies and MBTA bus and rail service, the area is especially attractive commuters. Business and industry are also discovering Randolph, many of them occupying prime space in a 150-acre garden style industrial park. A flourishing downtown commercial center provides shopping and services to residents. Many handsome older homes are located in elegant established neighborhoods, mingling with newer apartments and condominiums. Recreational facilities include a wonderful community playground, ice-skating rink, an indoor swimming pool, playgrounds, and athletic fields.

 

Rochester
Town Hall
508-763-3871
http://townofrochestermass.com

Rochester is located in southeastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lakeville and Middleboro on the north, Wareham and Marion on the east, Mattapoisett on the south and Acushnet and Freetown on the west. Rochester is about 19 miles northeast of New Bedford; 50 miles south of Boston; 49 miles east of Providence, Rhode Island. Rural Rochester still retains many of the farms that began in the town over 300 years ago. Rochester’s agricultural character, winding roads, and open space are evident as one travels throughout the town and views scenic pastures, meadows, woodlands, ponds, and cranberry bogs. Rochester is landlocked within the borders of Lakeville and Middleboro on the north, Wareham and Marion on the east, Mattapoisett on the south, and Acushnet and Freetown on the west. Rochester Center, at the Town Common, is where the town’s history began. The site of the first meeting house is marked by a stone, the old cemetery has gravestones dating back to 1707, and Rochester’s World War II memorials are all nearby. The Town Hall, Joseph H. Plumb Library, the post office, a bakery, and Plumb Corner Mall are also located at Rochester Center.

 

Rockland
City Hall
781-871-1874
http://rockland-ma.gov

This comfortable community is a town of rolling country hills and beautiful old shade trees that grace fine old residences. Once a center for the shoe industry the town today, is primarily residential in nature. This attractive South Shore community is actually comprised of several residential districts, each one claiming characteristics. In this large residential expanse, newcomers will find a variety of housing from handsome older residences in established neighborhoods to newer construction in modern developments. A good mix of apartments, condominiums, and townhomes provide the option for a maintenance-free lifestyle. Commuting to work centers is a popular and easy option for residents. Outdoor enthusiasts can participate in swimming, canoeing, cross-country skiing, and other activities sponsored by the recreation commission.

 

Scituate
Municipal Offices
781-545-8700
www.scituatema.gov

Chamber of Commerce
781-545-4000
http://scituatechamber.org

The sea, salt marshes, long white beaches, and dramatic cliffs make Scituate one of the most beautiful coastal communities in Massachusetts. Over 12 miles of shoreline are enhanced by a quaint harbor area and one of the best deep-water harbors on the East Coast. In the centuries since the town’s incorporation, the community has evolved from a summer colony to a residential haven without losing the charm of its historic past. Many new homes have been constructed within the past decade, although a good selection of older colonials and Cape Cods are graced by large shade trees. Residents pride themselves on the strength of their school system. Recreational amenities are abundant, with yacht clubs and country clubs, tennis courts, playing fields, and winter ice-skating on the cranberry bogs and ponds.

 

Seekonk
Town Hall
508-336-2900
http://seekonk-ma.gov

The Town of Seekonk is a suburban community on the Rhode Island border. It was incorporated in 1812 from the western half of Rehoboth and contains rolling hills with extensive swamp acreage in the central portions of the town. The town was basically an agricultural from its early days into the 20th century, although the Kent Manufacturing Company did make tennis racquets and croquet sets on the upper reaches of the Ten Mile River. With the opening of the Providence and Taunton street railway in 1891, Seekonk became increasingly a residential suburb of Providence. Very few farms still exist in Seekonk today as development has turned the farms into housing subdivisions and Seekonk is used largely as a suburban home community for people who work in the Rhode Island and Boston areas. It is now well known for its retail area along Route 6, which includes a movie multiplex, many different chain stores and restaurants. The Seekonk Speedway, a “fast track” destination for ARC or auto racing club, as well as the Seekonk Golf Driving Range with batting cages and new miniature golf. Although there has been a great deal of building in Seekonk since the Wampanoag Indians first lived in the area, residents can still see many of the “black” Canada geese which give the town its name.

 

Somerset
Town Hall
508-646-2818
www.townofsomerset.org

Somerset is a full service suburban community located 20 miles southeast of Providence, Rhode Island and 44 miles south of Boston. The town is located on the western shore of the Taunton River and Mount Hope Bay. Incorporated in 1790, the town has a rich and colorful heritage dating back to colonial days. Somerset is a wonderful community with an excellent school system for children and a wonderful Council on Aging program for the senior citizens of the area. The area is home to a recreational waterfront with a boat yard and beaches for the residents. It is in close proximity to Boston and yet the housing prices are substantially lower than the greater Boston area. All of this adds to the attractiveness of this beautiful family community. The town is a suburban community with some small scale resort and second home development and its 15 miles of waterfront are primarily used for recreation rather than industry. Residents have easy access to everything that they need close to home.

 

Swansea
Town Hall
508-674-5730
www.town.swansea.ma.us

Swansea is bordered by Barrington and Warren, Rhode Island, on the west and southwest; the mouth of the Taunton River on the south; Somerset on the east; and Dighton, Rehoboth, and Seekonk on the north. Swansea is about 4 miles west of Fall River; 47 miles south of Boston and 12 miles southeast of Providence, Rhode Island. The entire town is a part of the Narragansett Bay Watershed area. The town’s neighborhoods include Barneyville, North Swansea, Birch Swamp Corner, Hortonville, Luther Corner, South Swansea, Touissett, Ocean Grove, and Smokerise. Much of the town’s retail businesses are located along the highways, with the area around the junction of Routes 6 and 118 being the location of Swansea Mall, a large single-level mall that is the center of the retail district. The area along Route 103 between Lees River and the Cole River is also an area for retail, with many smaller businesses lining the road. However, outside of the retail area (as well as the densely populated neighborhoods of Ocean Grove, South Swansea & Smokerise), much of the area in this community is still rural with much of its agricultural land still open and undeveloped.  Swansea also retains 16 impressive and significant examples of intact Colonial houses that date back to the very beginnings of this part of the state.

Westport
Town Hall
508-636-1000
www.westport-ma.com

The Town of Westport is a natural haven nestled securely between Dartmouth and the eastern edge of Rhode Island. It’s about an hour’s drive South of Boston, offers beautiful country settings and magnificent beach and waterfront areas. Bordered to the North-West by South Watuppa Pond and Sawdy Pond, and, boasting over eight miles of direct frontage on Buzzards Bay and approximately thirty-five miles of shoreline between the East and West Branch of the Westport River and its estuary, Westport has much to offer freshwater and saltwater enthusiasts alike. Settled in 1670 and incorporated in 1787, Westport has a heritage rich in American history. The western-most portion of the coastal tract (stretching from what is now Fairhaven) that was purchased from the Wampanoag Indians in 1652 by the elders of the Plymouth Colony, the land was subsequently sold in smaller parcels to Quakers and Baptists who were seeking to escape religious persecution. Westport Point had originally been used by the Indians as a summer encampment, called “Pacquachuck” or “cleared hill”, where they engaged in farming and fishing. Known historically for its whaling industry and rum-running enterprises, the Westport coastline has developed into a favorite Mecca for beach-loving tourists and summer residents. Horseneck Beach has been maintained as a State Reservation by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Department of Environmental Management since 1956, and the Cherry & Webb Beach is managed by the Town, offering tourists and residents’ magnificent stretches of sandy white beaches and the whimsical drifts of dunes. Although Westport has become more of a bedroom community for people working in Boston and Providence, its population of nearly fourteen thousand has had little impact on the rural flavor of this community.

 

Weymouth
Municipal Offices
781-335-2000
www.weymouth.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
781-421-3900
www.southshorechamber.com

This attractive South Shore community is actually comprised of several residential districts, each one claiming characteristics. In this large residential expanse, newcomers will find a variety of housing from handsome older residences in established neighborhoods to newer construction in modern developments. A good mix of apartments, condominiums, and townhomes provide the option for a maintenance-free lifestyle. This popular beachfront community is conveniently located just 30 minutes from the Hub. Commuter bus and rail service are available in nearby Quincy. Recreational amenities are centered around Wessagusset Beach, although tennis courts, parks, playgrounds, a boat marina, and swimming opportunities are also available. While undeveloped land is not available, redevelopment of existing sites continues to transform and modernize the face of the community.

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