WORCESTER COUNTY

County Offices
455 Main Street
Worcester 508-929-1300
www.worcesterma.gov

Worcester County is considered the heartland of Massachusetts. Located at the center of the state, it is also bordered on the north by New Hampshire and on the south by Connecticut. The area is a blend of wide expanses of open, rolling land, mountainous regions and flat industrial sectors.

Some residents work along the industrial corridors of I-495 and Route 128. Others commute to Boston, Western Massachusetts and even Connecticut. But more and more people are choosing to both live and work in the Worcester area, which offers a good supply of housing and employment opportunities, as well as high quality of life.

The focal point of Worcester County is the City of Worcester, second oldest city in the state and the second largest city in New England. But Worcester is also a city of “firsts.” The first liquid rocket fuel was invented here as well as the first power loom and the first mass produced Valentine.

Services
The towns in Worcester County vary in size and style but all share a common history. Previously agricultural communities, they have become transformed into modern suburbs with carefully planned commercial growth. Many towns have attracted new industries which have provided local employment opportunities.

Education is a top priority and Worcester County’s school systems enjoy an excellent reputation. The county offers a variety of housing choices including single family tract homes in new subdivisions, apartments, and condominiums. Small farms and horse properties are also available.

Quality of Life
The Central Massachusetts countryside is a peaceful place with lakes, hills and pastureland. Residents can pick apples in autumn, go downhill and cross-country skiing in winter and enjoy the lakes and ponds during the summer season.

Worcester County has carefully preserved the landmarks, artifacts and historic sites of its Colonial heritage that make it such a special place. Clara Barton’s birthplace, Salisbury Mansion and General Artemus Ward’s home are all outstanding examples of restored 18th and 19th century architecture with important links to America’s past. Old Sturbridge Village, a living-history museum, recreates life in a New England community in the 1830s.

Rich in state parks and outdoor recreational facilities, massive 40 square mile Quabbin Reservoir offers scenic overlooks and hiking paths. Other parks include Douglas State Park, Quinsigamond State Park, Petersham and Leominster State Forests, and Wachusett Mountain State Park with its popular downhill ski area.

Worcester County, where farms, suburbs and cities co-exist side by side, offers the unique opportunity to enjoy peaceful and picturesque surroundings, a variety of housing and lifestyle options with all the facilities and amenities of a modern urban area.

Athol
Municipal Offices
978-249-4551
www.athol-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-249-3849
www.northquabbinchamber.com

Proud of its reputation as a hard-working, blue-collar community, Athol was settled as a New England mill town and later emerged as a strong metalwork manufacturing hub.  The town is nestled in the beautiful North Quabbin region of west-central Massachusetts between the picturesque Tully Mountains to the north and the vast Quabbin Reservoir to the south. Athol offers a unique blend of rural and urban characteristics including a traditional downtown shopping district. Recreational opportunities are unrivaled, including camping, hunting, and fishing. The annual River Rat Race draws thousands of visitors to the area each year. A lively arts community brings Broadway to town at least four times each year and encourages the expression of local talent.

Ashburnham
Municipal Offices
978-827-4100
www.ashburnham-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-632-1780
www.gardnerma.com

Nestled in the picturesque, gently rolling hills of northern Worcester County, the town of Ashburnham is the quintessential image of a New England community. Ashburnham enjoys a reputation as a premier vacation destination, and local residents feel fortunate to call this beautiful area their home around the four seasons. More than 20 panoramic lakes dot the town and eight are of significant size. Visitors from across the Northeast consider the Ashburnham area to be one of the most attractive and relaxing for holiday and vacation getaways. On a typical summer weekend, the population nearly doubles. The decade of the 1980s saw a real boom in new residents, drawn by the area’s natural beauty, moderate tax rates, good home values, and excellent school system. Growth since that time has been slower but remains steady.

Auburn
Municipal Offices
508-832-7701
www.auburnguide.com

Chamber of Commerce
508-753-2924
http://auburnchamberma.org

The charming town of Auburn is conveniently located to Routes 20 and 290 as well as the Massachusetts Turnpike, drawing many commuters to an idyllic suburban setting. Auburn Mall attracts shoppers from across the region and adds to the town’s solid tax base. Controlled growth has resulted in considerable local employment opportunities that harmonize well with lovely residential neighborhoods and the surrounding panoramic landscape of valleys and farmland. The Auburn Recreational Center, Goddard Memorial Park, a municipal golf course, Horgan Skating Rink, tennis courts, and supervised recreation programs are a few of options for leisure enjoyment. The cultural community is well developed and includes several performance groups. Auburn is proud of a rich history dating back to 1778 and has preserved countless treasures from the past in colonial architecture, cemeteries, and fine museums.

Barre
Municipal Offices
978-355-5003
www.townofbarre.com

Chamber of Commerce
978-632-1780
www.gardnerma.com

Encompassing the villages of Barre, Barre Plains, and South Barre, the town of Barre is a small rural community about 60 miles from Boston—located nearly in the exact center of the state. Yesterday’s farms continue to dwindle, destined to grow tomorrow’s crop of new homes instead. Residents are particularly proud of one of the loveliest town commons in central Massachusetts, the site of summer band concerts. A significant influx of newcomers in recent years reflects the search for affordable housing and a more relaxed pace of life. The population increase has diversified the town, bringing new residents who have distinct needs and high expectations of town services. Barre is prepared to rise to the challenge, already offering a progressive school system and an efficient local government with a balanced budget.

Berlin
Municipal Offices
978-838-2931
www.townofberlin.com

Chamber of Commerce
978-568-0360
www.assabetvalleychamber.org

The residential haven of Berlin provides a tranquil and beautiful bedroom community with easy access to Interstate 495. The town nestles in a low range of hills between the Nashua and Assabet river valleys to offer a charming rural atmosphere. Berlin has a history of specialty market gardening and poultry farming, and traces of yesterday’s brisk agricultural activity can still be found. Local shopping is sufficient to meet daily needs, with expanded retail centers nearby. Maintaining its position as a small and stable town in spite of more rapid growth in neighboring communities, Berlin features a Victorian town hall adorned with photos of local residents who fought in the Civil War. Attractive housing in a variety of styles, recreational facilities and amenities, and a proud community spirit add to the quality of life.

Boylston
Municipal Offices
508-869-2234
www.boylston-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-772-6976
www.nvcoc.com

The small residential community of Boylston is proud of its agricultural heritage and historical treasures. Residents enjoy an excellent public school system and many recreational programs. The town is fortunate to have an active historical society and environmentally conscious leaders. In fact, Boylston operates a forestry maintenance program with a demonstration forest at its Hillside municipal complex—also the site of the magnificent Hillside mansion. Residents still enjoy the peace and tranquility of the town’s traditional rural charm. Recreational facilities include seven-mile long Lake Quinsigamond, cross-country skiing, hiking and fishing at Wachusett Reservoir, and summer concerts in the park. Commercial conveniences are on the rise, and the town is encouraging controlled growth along the Route 140 business corridor. Commuters enjoy easy access to Interstate 495 and Route 290.

Brookfield
Municipal Offices
508-867-2930
www.brookfieldma.us

Chamber of Commerce
413-283-2418
www.qhma.com

The small rural community of Brookfield is situated along Route 9 between Worcester and Springfield, offering easy access to the Massachusetts Turnpike. The town has transitioned from an agricultural center into a tranquil bedroom community for larger cities to the east and west. Nestled in a panoramic region that features open space, sparkling lakes, and rolling rivers, Brookfield also provides well-managed recreational programs within the town. The area’s quality elementary schools are part of the Tantasqua Regional School District. Each Columbus Day weekend, visitors from across New England arrive for the Apple Country Fair and the chance to enjoy the atmosphere in this small rural town in autumn’s splendor. Suburban housing blends new and older homes, many with acreage and animal privileges. Swimming, fishing, ice-skating, cross-country skiing, sports play, hiking, biking, and camping are common activities.

Charlton
Municipal Offices
508-248-2200
www.townofcharlton.net

Chamber of Commerce
508-347-2761
www.cmschamber.org

Serving as a suburb of Worcester, Charlton is located west of Auburn. Picturesque dairy farms and orchards create a scenic backdrop for residential development as well as an economic mainstay. Recent decades have brought significant growth to this area, with a business corridor expanding along Route 20. In fact, the town is one of the fastest growing in Massachusetts. Charlton is geographically the second largest town in the Commonwealth, drawing newcomers to beautiful new homes and opportunities for large lots and acreage. Area attractions include Buffumville Lake, Capen Hill Nature Sanctuary, country clubs, farm attractions, and family entertainment centers. Two of the most important landmarks in Charlton are the Masonic Home and the Rider Tavern, built in 1799.

Clinton
Municipal Offices
978-365-4119
www.clintonma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
508-829-9220
www.wachusettareachamber.org

Residents of Clinton are justly proud of their hometown, a beautiful rural New England community surrounded by the Wachusetts Reservoir. Magnificent architectural preservation, a community hospital, cultural attractions, the traditional downtown district, the Nashua River Walk, Central Park, sunsets over the reservoir, views of Mount Wachusett, and the Clinton Dam are just a few of the highlights. Beautiful Victorian homes grace the Cedar Hill neighborhood, harmonizing with lovely well-kept older homes and newer construction for a medley of housing options. Excellent schools serve the youth, and sports facilities and programs are available for all groups and interests. The recreational amenities are first rate, including a community swimming pool, a splash park, sports courts and fields, ice and roller skating rinks, and a rifle range.

Douglas
Town Hall
508-476-4000
www.douglasma.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-234-9090
www.blackstonevalley.org

Douglas is located in Southern Worcester County. It is a growing community with a population of a little more than 8,000 residents. The area occupied by the town also includes the Douglas State Forest, a large State forest managed by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR). The Town of Douglas is a residential community between the Blackstone and French River valleys on an historic east-west corridor.  It is on the southern border of Massachusetts where Rhode Island and Connecticut come together. The town was named after Dr. William Douglas of Boston, who donated funds for the creation of free schools in the town. The town’s economy was built on agriculture, lumbering, charcoal making, cattle and sheep farming.  In the 19th century, this expanded to include the manufacturing of cotton and woolen textiles, shoes, axes and other edged tools. Today as agriculture has become less important, much of the agricultural land has slowly reverted to woods. Douglas is a community that goes to great lengths to preserve its historic buildings, both residential and commercial.  The town retains farm buildings and mill buildings, 19th and 20th century residential buildings built for the working classes, the middle classes and the well-to-do.  The town’s architecture shows an unusually complete picture of community development through the middle of the 20th century. This collection of buildings draws many people to the town as a living museum. Residents enjoy a reasonably quiet lifestyle that is based around a strong community with all of the services and amenities that they need close to home. Commuting is easy thanks to the great location and nature takes a primary seat in this town.

Fitchburg
Municipal Offices
978-829-1800
www.ci.fitchburg.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
978-353-7600
www.northcentralmass.com

Dubbing itself “the city by the river,” Fitchburg is one of the largest cities in Worcester County. In spite of growth and development, the community retains all the friendliness and charm of a small town. The city is known for the historic mills that line the Nashua River, its hilly topography, regional parks, and close-knit neighborhood enclaves. Other points of interest include the Fitchburg Art Museum, Fitchburg State College, and the world-famous Longsjo Classic bicycle race. Fitchburg is located just 10 miles from New Hampshire and 50 miles from Boston, offering excellent access via highway or MBTA commuter train to all points. Once dependent upon the paper industry, this region has developed a diverse and health economy that encompasses pharmaceuticals, tool and die makers, machine manufacturers, plastic molders, and textile producers.

Gardner
Municipal Offices
978-632-1900
www.gardner-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-632-1780
www.gardnerma.com

Located 30 miles northwest of Worcester and 60 miles northwest of Boston, the dynamic city of Gardner claims a proud past in furniture manufacturing. In fact, the city achieved such international fame as a major center for chair fabrication that it became known as the “chair city of the world.” The city’s monument to this heritage is visible in front of the Helen Mae Sauter School in the form of a 20-foot-tall chair. While Gardner still claims a strong manufacturing sector, it is known today as the “Furniture Capital of New England” and offers a number of fine furniture outlets. Gardner is proud to provide exceptional services and amenities that include Mount Wachusett Community College, Heywood Hospital, many unique shops, and wide array of recreational opportunities including an outstanding municipal golf course and the southern terminus of the North Central Pathway.

Grafton
Town Hall
508-839-5335
www.grafton-ma.gov

Blackstone Valley Chamber of Commerce
508 234-9090
www.blackstonevalley.org

Grafton is a good example of a traditional New England community that has successfully blended its historic past with modern economic growth. Conveniently located to downtown Worcester, Grafton provides residential areas with a scenic backdrop of open space and apple orchards. Development has been carefully controlled so that the quality of life in the town remains high.

A variety of housing alternatives are available to newcomers, from older homes to new construction.

Hardwick, Gilbertville
Municipal Offices
413-477-6700
www.townofhardwick.com

Chamber of Commerce
413-283-2418
www.quaboagvalley.org

The population of Hardwick is divided between the town’s four villages: Gilbertville, Hardwick Center, Old Furnace, and Wheelwright. The textile center of Gilbertville is the location of the town offices, while Harwick Center features the picturesque New England town common. Clustered around the common are lovely churches, the restored Harwick Town House, and the historic schoolhouse that serves the local historical society as a museum and headquarters. Many of the historic homes that line the common appear much the same as they might have 150 years ago. The Harwick Community Fair is distinguished as one of the oldest continuously operating fairs in the nation. This “country community” features a number of working dairy farms and miles of multi-purpose trails through more than 2,000-acres of scenic, state-protected land.

Holden
Municipal Offices
508-210-5500
www.holdenma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
508-829-9220
www.holdenareachamber.org

Situated north of Worcester and 40 miles from Boston, the town of Holden was settled in the 1700s as an agricultural center. The diverse and naturally beautiful landscape provides a scenic backdrop for lovely homes, with 90 percent of the available land zones as residential. Residents enjoy an excellent school system, a local library, efficient civic services, and a small-town spirit. During the mid 20th century, Holden offered some popular snow-skiing features. Today, residents travel to nearby Wachusett Mountain for winter sports. Much of the township’s vast 36 square miles is protected as open space, watershed, and recreational areas. These considerable natural resources enhance the already enviable quality of life.

Hubbardston
Municipal Offices
978-928-1400
www.hubbardstonma.us

Chamber of Commerce
978-632-1780
www.gardnerma.com

Nestled in the hill country of central Massachusetts, the town of Hubbardston is bordered by Gardner and Westminster to the northeast and Princeton and Rutland to the southeast. Barre lies to the southwest and Phillipston and Templeton share the northwest boundary. The town is just 20 miles from Worcester and 56 miles northwest of Boston. Although residents enjoy close proximity to exceptional recreational land for four-season outdoor activity, the town has developed significant resources. The local recreation commission offers diverse programs for all ages and sponsors popular seasonal events and activities for the community. Local recreational facilities include a skate park, a special children’s playground, and Curtis Recreation Field.

Leicester
Municipal Offices
508-892-7000
www.leicesterma.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-753-2924
http://auburnchamberma.org

Situated along the western border of Worcester, the quiet and livable community of Leicester offers easy access to urban amenities. This growing suburb is well known for its active historic preservation efforts. Charming and grand architecture from the past adorns the town, home to Rochdale Village and other well-preserved milling centers. Rochdale still maintains the original village school, store, fire barn, mills, and mill housing. The reverence for the past in Leicester is far-reaching, encompassing walking tours and developing curriculum-based historic programs for local schools. The community plays a vital role in the Blackstone Valley Heritage Corridor, characterized as a naturally beautiful “virtual park” with a living landscape where regional residents live, work, and play.

Leominster
Municipal Offices
978-534-7500
www.leominster-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-353-7600
www.northcentralmass.com

Settled in 1653, historic Leominster is located along Route 190 just 44 miles west of Boston. This desirable community offers the amenities and conveniences of urban living without the associated crowds and traffic for a more relaxed pace of life. Residents have easy access to exclusive metropolitan Boston shopping, cultural attractions, and entertainment. Public transportation is available locally and regionally into Boston and other surrounding key points of interest. Highlights within Leominster include an art museum, a cultural affairs office, and many options for fine and casual dining. The home choices in this area are diverse and attractive, from stately colonials to Cape Cods and ranches. Recreational amenities include swimming pools, Cross Hill State Park, golf courses, and country clubs.

Lancaster
Municipal Offices
978-365-3326
www.ci.lancaster.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
978-632-1780
www.gardnerma.com

Originally settled in 1643, historic Lancaster was established as a center of trade with Native American Indians. The community is proud of its status as one of the first settlements in all of New England. Lancaster features a tranquil country atmosphere where neighborhoods have managed to retain the charm of a rural ambiance. Many well-crafted historic homes are available in this area, graced by the beauty of mature foliage and ancient shade trees. Residents enjoy a 450-acre conservation area for a multitude of outdoor sports and adventures as well as tennis courts, athletic fields, and a public beach. Both Worcester and Boston are available within a reasonable commute for expanded cultural and shopping experiences.

Millbury
Municipal Offices
508-865-4710
www.millbury-ma.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-234-9090
www.blackstonevalley.org

Nestled in the heart of Massachusetts in the panoramic Blackstone Valley, Millbury is located at the intersection of Route 146 and Interstate 90 or the Massachusetts Turnpike. On the southern edge of Worcester with its expanded urban and commuter amenities, the town fringes the scenic Blackstone River. The town works closely with other communities and the Blackstone River National Heritage Corridor to ensure water quality and public enjoyment of the river. The Blackstone Bikeway links Millbury to Worcester and Pawtucket, Rhode Island, on the south. The largest economic development in the town’s history was completed in 2004 with the opening of the Shoppes at Blackstone Valley, an upscale shopping, dining, and entertainment center. Highway improvements have accelerated the development in Millbury, although new residents will still be impressed by the visual appeal of the area’s considerable natural resources and the warm community spirit.

Northbridge
Municipal Offices
508-234-2095
www.northbridgemass.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-234-9090
www.blackstonevalley.org

The growing suburban town of Northbridge is cradled in the highly desirable Blackstone Valley area, designated as an All American Region. The increasing popularity of Northbridge and other valley towns is due in part to transportation efficiencies and the close proximity to the urban amenities and employment centers of Worcester. Several friendly villages have developed within Northbridge, including Linwood, Northbridge, Riverdale, Rockdale, and Whitinsville. The natural resources that once made Northbridge an industrial area now serve as a panoramic backdrop for residential and economic development. Commuters enjoy a quiet and attractive suburban community atmosphere in a prime location between Interstates 90, 146, 395, and 495 for unparalleled access to regional destinations.

Northborough
Town Hall
508-393-5001
www.town.northborough.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-836-4444
www.corridornine.org

Northborough began as an industrial community that manufactured iron and wood products. Eventually, it emerged as an agricultural town. A pleasant combination of farmland and suburbs, Northborough is characterized by farms, woodlands and pastures.

Both a popular suburb of Worcester and Marlborough, it continues to enjoy stable growth. Ski areas are available within an hour’s drive. A wide range of architectural styles include stately Colonials and newer condominiums.

Oxford
Municipal Offices
508-987-6032
www.town.oxford.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-753-2924
www.worcesterchamber.org

The small but vibrant community of Oxford is approximately 15 miles south of Worcester and 50 miles southwest of Boston. Oxford is also located to the southwest of Auburn, offering a suburban small-town atmosphere in close proximity to expanded urban amenities. Commuters enjoy easy access to Interstate 495 and Worcester employment centers. Founded in the 1700s, Oxford is the proud home of dignitaries like Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross. Steeped in historical pride and tradition, the town is home to the original Slater Mills that played such an integral part in the industrial revolution. Primarily residential, Oxford blends limited commercial and industrial activity for a balanced community. An outstanding recreational feature is located in the very heart of town, a scenic 1,000-acre flood plain and wildlife management area.

Paxton
Municipal Offices
508-754-7638
www.townofpaxton.net

Chamber of Commerce
508-829-9220
www.holdenareachamber.org

Like many of the small towns in the Worcester area, Paxton is committed to historic preservation and proudly protects a rich past. Residents are particularly proud of the 400-acre Moore State Park, incorporating many of Paxton’s celebrated historical sites and combining them with the enchantment of thousands of azaleas and rhododendrons. The flowers were planted by Florence Morton and the Spaulding family, whose estate became part of the state park. Just west of Holden, Paxton draws newcomers to quiet roads small housing clusters in a suburban setting. The picturesque Main Street, a quaint commercial center with village shops, and lovely neighborhoods are completely surrounded by natural wonders. Recreational amenities are abundant, and the local Kettlebrook Golf Course continually ranks as one of the finest in Massachusetts.

Petersham
Municipal Offices
978-724-3353
www.townofpetersham.org

Chamber of Commerce
978-249-3849
www.northquabbinchamber.com

The town of Petersham is nestled in the northeastern part of the Quabbin Reservoir area, ranking third in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in size. The town is easily accessible from Route 2 and from the Massachusetts Turnpike. The centerpiece of the picturesque historic district is the elegant town common, surrounded by scores of early 19th-century buildings. Most residents live in close proximity to the village center, with the remainder scattered throughout the town in a variety of residential developments, both old and new. This attractive community has attracted an equally diverse population who share an appreciation for small-town living. The single most outstanding feature of the town is the wealth of preserved land, including thousands of acres of Quabbin Reservation and large tracts of state and privately maintained conservation land.

Phillipston
Municipal Offices
978-249-6828
www.phillipston-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-632-1780
www.gardnerma.com

Characterized as a rural residential community, Phillipston is located along Route 2 at the northern entrance to the Quabbin recreation area. More than 90 percent of the property in Phillipston is either classified as residential or open space. Only a few businesses operate within the town, primarily independent contractors. As a result, Phillipston offers the exclusivity and seclusion of a rustic country home within an easy drive of major metropolitan amenities and attractions. Residents enjoy a number of recreational amenities close to home including campgrounds and a public beach at Queen Lake. The Quabbin Reservoir region provides unrivaled natural beauty and opportunities for four-season outdoor adventures.

Princeton
Municipal Offices
978-464-2103
http://town.princeton.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-829-9220
www.holdenareachamber.org

The most physically distinguishing hallmark of Princeton is Mount Wachusett, the highest point in Massachusetts east of the Connecticut River. Residents of Princeton literally look down upon Boston approximately 50 miles away. This small community has always held an exclusive attitude about growth and development, avoiding urbanization and maintaining a wonderfully rural character. Even newcomers soon share the general opinion that the population should be rigidly controlled. Once famous as a popular summer resort for the wealthy, Princeton still welcomes visitors to Mount Wachusett State Reservation with its skiing and hiking attractions. The housing selection is an attractive blend of elegant, antique colonials and contemporaries in a variety of architectural styles.

Royalston
Municipal Offices
978-249-0493
www.royalston-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-249-3849
www.northquabbinchamber.com

With the shores of Millers River to the east, the town of Royalston claims New Hampshire on the north. This area that encompasses unique ridges that were carved by ancient glacial runoff provides unrivaled scenic beauty throughout the four seasons. Three cascading waterfalls, lush state forests, and thousands of acres of conservation land make this an outdoor enthusiast’s paradise. Nearly every imaginable activity and sport is available against a backdrop of breathtaking scenery. One of the most important treasures in Royalston is the close-knit community spirit that has prevailed for centuries, giving the town its warmth and distinctive character.

Shrewsbury
Municipal Offices
508-841-8507
www.shrewsbury-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
508-836-4444
www.corridornine.org

Attracting newcomers to a scenic suburban community set on a diverse terrain cut by picturesque streams, Shrewsbury resembles a Norman Rockwell painting in the winter months with residents skating on the town’s outdoor rinks. Although Shrewsbury offers considerable commercial development along Route 9 and shopping centers, the town has retained its rural flavor and charm. As one of the fastest growing areas in Massachusetts, Shrewsbury is well known for beautiful, well-maintained neighborhoods that harmonize lovely older homes and new construction. The town is ideally located in the “golden triangle” between Route 495 and 290 and the Massachusetts Turnpike. Routes 9, 20, and 140 directly serve the town. Many residents are commuters to nearby biotech, medical, and computer industry companies. The local economy focuses on agriculture, the resort industry, recreation, and services.

Southborough
Municipal Offices
508-485-0710
www.southboroughtown.com

Chamber of Commerce
508-836-4444
www.corridornine.org

Located 15 miles east of Worcester and 25 miles west of Boston, the scenic town of Southborough offers a low-density rural/suburban atmosphere. Nearly one-quarter of the town is covered by the beautiful Sudbury Reservoir, and winding roads through panoramic country scenes add to the charm. Southborough is located in the heart of New England and crossed by Route 9, the Massachusetts Turnpike, and Interstate 495 for unparalleled convenience and easy commutes. Two prestigious private boarding schools in the quaint village center and excellent public schools give the town a reputation for quality education. Developed recreational amenities include sports fields and courts, picnic areas, and supervised programs. Beautiful older homes blend with new construction for a medley of housing choices.

Sterling
Municipal Offices
978-422-8111
www.sterling-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
508-829-9220
www.wachusettareachamber.org

Small and primarily residential, Sterling is nestled in the foothills of Mount Wachusett for four-season recreational opportunities. Until recent decades, Sterling has been a sleepy agricultural community of rolling hills, pastures, and spectacular mountain vistas. In fact, Sterling is the home of Mary Sawyer of “Mary had a little lamb” fame. Today, that historic fact is celebrated by a lamb statue in the Town Common. Another claim to fame for the town is Butterick dress patterns, created by entrepreneur Ebenezer Butterick. Interstate 90 provides good commutes to Worcester and Fitchburg, connecting this rural community to fine museums, cultural attractions, expanded shopping, and regional recreational sites. The Sterling Town Fair is an annual favorite, drawing throngs of visitors.

Sturbridge
Municipal Offices
508-347-2500
www.town.sturbridge.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-347-2761
www.cmschamber.org

The small town of Sturbridge is nationally famous for one of the state’s most popular attractions, Sturbridge Village. This recreation of a New England community in the mid 1800s covers 200 acres with scores of beautifully restored homes, mills, crafts shops, and open space with grazing cattle. Tourism enlivens the town, which is highly regarded for its sense of pride and historic preservation. Many of the town’s residents are descendants of original settlers, adding rich character to a charming New England atmosphere. The Town Common is also a National Historic District, surrounded by homes and public buildings that were constructed in the late 17th and early 18th century and impeccably maintained. The Publick House is another world-famous historic site, serving today as a restaurant and inn. Sturbridge is located within an hour’s drive from major airports and offers easy highway access to Routes 84, 20, and the Massachusetts Turnpike.

Sutton
Municipal Offices
508-865-8725
www.suttonma.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-234-9090
www.blackstonevalley.org

The rural town of Sutton is located along the Route 146 corridor, approximately 15 minutes from the bustle and urban amenities of Worcester. Sutton is also an hour’s drive from Metropolitan Boston via the Massachusetts Turnpike, which opens a world of cosmopolitan advantages to residents of this peaceful country community. Picturesque scenes around, from the charming gazebo in the town green to dairy and horse farms. Several villages dot the landscape, each one with unique amenities. Manchaug offers a mill shopping area and scenic waterfall. Residential South Sutton features a senior center, while West Sutton remains decidedly rural with rolling hills and equestrian properties. Wilkinsonville in northern Sutton has a small shopping area and the fire station. Sutton Center serves as the hub village, home to the town green, the town hall, and a lovely large church.

Templeton, Baldwinville
Municipal Offices
978-894-2758
www.templeton1.org

Chamber of Commerce
978-632-1780
www.gardnerma.com

Characterized as a rural community with significant historic architecture, the town of Templeton encompasses four distinctive villages: Templeton, East Templeton, Baldwinville, and Otter River. Many residents are commuters to Gardner, which also expands many of the amenities and attractions. Limited industry operates locally, including paper and printing businesses. Residents enjoy a broad recreational base anchored by the Otter River State Forest that sprawls beyond the town border into neighboring Winchendon. This north-central community is bordered by Royalston and Winchendon on the north, Gardner on the east, Hubbardston on the southeast, and Phillipston on the west. Templeton is only five miles west of Gardner, providing a tranquil and scenic bedroom community.

Upton
Municipal Offices
508-529-3565
www.upton.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-234-9090
www.blackstonevalley.org

The scenic town of Upton is approximately 15 miles southeast of Worcester and 36 miles southwest of Boston, providing easy access to premier urban amenities and regional employment centers. Nestled in the beautiful Blackstone Valley, Upton provides the warmth and charm of a small-town setting with a family oriented lifestyle. Highlights in the town include the local library, an active historical society, programs and facilities managed by the recreation commission, and the breathtaking beauty of Upton State Forest. Newcomers to Upton will be able to choose from well-kept older homes filled with character and newer construction in a variety of settings. Cozy neighborhoods in a tree-shaded village atmosphere contrast with rural properties that offer sweeping lots or multi-acre sites with horse privileges.

Uxbridge
Town Hall
508-278-8600
www.uxbridge-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
508-234-9090
www.blackstonevalley.org

The Town of Uxbridge lies on the southern border of Massachusetts at the Rhode Island line, it is home to more than 11,000 residents. The community is industrial, agricultural and residential in nature and both the Blackstone River, two of its major tributaries and several large brooks run through town. Established as a town in 1727, Uxbridge’s exceptional water power provided the basis for large scale industrial development beginning as early as 1775. Uxbridge was known for its woolens production, since Cashmere woolens and military uniforms were made in the town for more than140 years. The first woolen mill in the Blackstone Valley was built here in 1809. Uxbridge marks the center of the Blackstone Valley Heritage Corridor. There are more than 300 state or national historic sites in the area. Residents and visitors enjoy a piece of American history that is preserved in the many structures and attitudes found in the area. They will find many shops and restaurants as well as historic landmarks in town. Uxbridge has a school district with more than 2100 students enrolled in grades K through 12. With its scenic riverside location, treasured past and high quality of life, Uxbridge is a wonderful place to settle.

Webster, Dudley
Webster Offices
508-949-3800
www.webster-ma.gov
Dudley Offices
508-949-8000
www.dudleyma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
508-753-2924
www.worcesterchamber.org

The towns of Webster and Dudley share a location along the border between Massachusetts and Connecticut. Webster’s most dramatic feature is a breathtaking freshwater, spring-fed lake with a scenic shoreline that stretches for five miles. Fishing, water skiing and other water sports, swimming, boating, and sailing are all common pastimes. Also along the lakeshore, Indian Ranch was celebrated as the New England home of country music, drawing visitors from across the Northeast. The factories that once flourished in Webster enriched the community with diverse cultures, an asset that prevails today. The rural community of Dudley is an upland college town graced by two major rivers. Nichols College blends an intellectual element into a primarily rural setting that still preserves picturesque images of poultry and dairy farms.

West Boylston
West Boylston Offices
774-261-4010
www.westboylston.com

Chamber of Commerce
508-829-9220
www.wachusettareachamber.org

Known as a civic-minded community that enjoys an abundance of scenic views, West Boyleston is especially popular with commuters who are looking for access to Interstate 495 and Route 290. Also convenient to Route 190, West Boyleston nestles along the sparkling shoreline of the Wachusett Reservoir just north of Worcester. Newcomers will discover the charm and visual appeal of a quintessential New England setting and the finest features of small-town living. Metropolitan amenities including cultural attractions, expanded shopping, and entertainment centers are available close to home. Highlights within the community include historic preservation, family oriented neighborhoods, thriving small businesses, high-ranking schools, and a truly beautiful natural setting. Local and regional recreational opportunities are first rate, from water sports to winter outdoor adventures.

Westborough
Municipal Offices
508-366-3020
www.town.westborough.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-836-4444
www.corridornine.org

Ideally located between Worcester and Framingham, Westborough is also strategically positioned at the crossroads of major transportation networks. Nevertheless, the town has managed to create a fine balance between the bustle of urban life and suburban serenity. Excellent schools, a high level of community spirit and participation, good civic services, and a strong sense of history are all hallmarks of Westborough. The community has managed to attract a significant sector of high-tech manufacturers and corporate headquarters along with brisk commercial development. The positive community climate has enabled the town to welcome this development without sacrificing beautiful open areas and the tranquility of residential neighborhoods.

Westminster
Municipal Offices
978-874-7406
www.westminster-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-632-1780
www.gardnerma.com

The proud original home of the famous Westminster crackers, the close-knit community of Westminster offers an attractive setting for lovely country homes. Residents value the rural and historic character of their town, while newcomers are drawn to the area’s natural beauty and prime location. Part of the rich heritage of Westminster is an active population who are eager to participate in governmental affairs. State Route 140 and Interstate 190 connect the region to Worcester, and the Springfield Terminal Railway line parallels Route 2 to offer access to the network of transportation facilities that serve central and eastern Massachusetts. The town is ideally located along the Johnny Appleseed Trail on Route 2.

Winchendon
Municipal Offices
978-297-2766
www.townofwinchendon.com

Chamber of Commerce
978-632-1780
www.gardnerma.com

Nestled in the greater Gardner area, the town of Winchendon is characterized as an industrial and residential highland community on the upper Millers River. Highlights within the community include several historic buildings from the 1800s, an aviation museum, and the WP Clark Memorial Community Center. Residents also enjoy the premier recreational amenities of the North Central Pathway and Lake Dennison State Park. Hiking, biking, camping, winter sports, fishing, hunting, backpacking, horseback riding, swimming, and boating are all available close to home. Gardner is available for expanded shopping, cultural attractions, fine dining, and entertainment.

Worcester City
Municipal Offices
508-929-1300
www.worcesterma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
508-753-2924
www.worcesterchamber.org

The second-largest metropolitan area after Boston within the Commonwealth, Worcester is 45 miles west of Boston in central Massachusetts. Worcester has evolved into a center of education, healthcare, and research and serves as the Worcester County seat of government. The city is also an important manufacturing, insurance, and transportation center. The cityscape climbs over a series of scenic hills overlooking the Blackstone River, with Lake Quinsigamond creating its eastern boundary. The Massachusetts Biotechnology Research Park and the Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology are just two of the impressive assets. Residents are well served by transportation efficiencies that include Interstates 90 and 290. The historic Union Station is the hub for MBTA commuter rail runs between Boston and Worcester. The city is filled with outstanding educational and cultural facilities, including Worcester State College, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Assumption College, Clark University, the College of the Holy Cross, the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Becker College, Quinsigamond Community College, and the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Famous libraries, elegant venues, performing companies, and respected art and history museums enrich the entire metropolitan area. National companies of Broadway shows perform at the Loew’s Theater, while stellar entertainment is featured at the Centrum Civic Center. The Worcester Classical Music Festival, held annually since 1858, is the oldest in the nation.

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