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NORTH SHORE

A picturesque and vast array of seacoast village, farming communities, summer resorts, residential suburbs, and industrial centers blend together to make up the area between Boston and the New Hampshire border. Newcomers will discover some of the most beautiful beaches in New England, as well as a rich historical legacy that dates back to the 17th century. The sea and maritime interests have always played a major role in the ambiance and economic development of this area, from the days when fishing and shipbuilding dominated the scene to today’s collection of intriguing galleries, boutiques, and antique shops.

While history is everywhere, so is the finest of the new millennium. For those planning to commute to Boston or to any of the high-tech companies located along the Route 128 corridor, the North Shore is an ideal choice. Although many of the towns that dot the North Shore no longer support the industries that originally spurred their growth, the age-old activities of fishing, shipbuilding and farming still abide. Over the years, the tourism and hospitality industries have grown to play a major economic role. Protected harbors nestled along the rocky and rugged coastline are home to picturesque fishing villages. In many cities, high-tech industrialization is replacing out-dated factories and warehouses. Many North Shore communities are experiencing a surge of commercial and residential growth, encouraging sweeping revitalization efforts in long-established areas as well as handsome new construction.

Services
The North Shore takes pride in the quality of local amenities and services, which include responsive, state-of-the-art healthcare in conveniently located hospitals and medical centers. Several of the state’s finest healthcare professionals make their rounds at more than 30 hospitals and medical centers located on the North Shore. Some of the best medical facilities in the world are located in nearby Boston. These hospitals are among the largest employers in the region. An intricate network of support industries to the expanding healthcare profession have sprung up as well.

First-rate public and private schools combine a strong core curriculum and dedicated staff with innovative programs for the gifted and challenged. Students not only receive a quality education, they have the opportunity to develop to full potential. Regional vocational and technical school offer practical skills and training to area youth, and students of all ages enjoy a wide selection of evening courses and adult continuing education programs. Residents of the North Shore are well educated, the product of the fine school systems found in many of the towns. Graduates often choose to settle down on the North Shore, increasing the number of specialized workers and professionals.

In keeping with Greater Boston’s emphasis on first-rate academics, a number of institutions of higher education are available close to home: Salem State, Endicott Junior College, Gordon College, and North Shore Community College. Salem State learning provides many undergraduate, graduate, and non-credit enrichment courses with strengths in education, nursing, geography, business, social work, and the liberal arts. Many of the 30 major areas of study benefit from national recognition.

Boston is less than an hour’s drive from most North Shore communities. Interstate 95 along with Routes 1, 114, and 128 ensure easy accessibility to all points in Massachusetts, while fast and convenient commuter trains provide an enjoyable alternative. Efficient bus service provided by the MBTA is available throughout the region and also to Logan International Airport.

Lifestyle
The sea, salt air, and charming atmosphere that characterizes the small towns and fishing villages of the North Shore continues to attract newcomers. Steeped in history and tradition, this scenic region has been home to prominent Massachusetts families for generations. Each town has retained a unique flavor and identity. Rockport’s art colony, Gloucester’s fishing fleet, Beverly and the beginnings of the American Navy, and Salem—once known as “New World Venice”—are just a few of the places that inspire stories of romance, adventure, and American innovation.

The natural beauty of the North Shore lends itself to limitless leisure activities and recreational opportunities. Miles of shoreline encourage beach activities and water sports. Many unspoiled areas have been preserved for hiking or just enjoying nature’s beauty. Restored sailing towns and fishing villages like Ipswich, Rockport, and Newburyport are ideal for exploring 17th and 18th-century homes and cottages.

Whale-watch from Gloucester, enjoy lobster on Cape Ann, discover an antique treasure in Essex, or visit the Witch House and the House of the Seven Gables in Salem. Parks and pastureland are ideal for riding horseback or polo at the Myopia Hunt Club. Some of the state’s most beautiful golf courses are located on the North Shore, doubling in the winter months as serene cross-country ski facilities. New England’s finest downhill skiing is less than an hour’s drive. Opportunities for shopping are abundant, from the welcoming shops in local commercial districts to more extensive facilities. Popular destinations for expanded shopping close to home are the Liberty Tree Mall and North Shore Shopping Center.

Housing in the North Shore is as varied as the region itself. Waterfront properties include picturesque cottages and magnificent homes that may include a private dock and beachfront. Elegantly appointed condominiums, vintage Victorians, or modest colonial and Cape Cod styles in friendly, suburban developments are all available.  Rambling farmhouses or country estates are ideal as horse properties or rural retreats.

In spite of the proliferation of new business and economic expansion, most residential areas are well separated from the new office parks. New construction is evident everywhere, ranging from modest suburban tracts to luxurious, executive homes. The North Shore blends colorful diversity, exceptional amenities, and accessibility to metropolitan advantages to ensure its place as one of the most beautiful and exciting places to call home in New England.

Amesbury
Municipal Offices
978-388-8100
www.amesburyma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-388-3178
www.amesburychamber.com

Offering a rural lifestyle in close proximity to a number of major attractions in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, Amesbury claims the transportation advantages of Interstate 95 and excellent bus service to Boston. A country atmosphere and panoramic views of the Merrimack River create a pleasing backdrop for community amenities such as shopping, healthcare, first-rate public schools, and extensive opportunities for recreation and relaxation. Civic pride is strong in this small but well developed bedroom community. Among the rich historic legacies in Amesbury is the home of noted poet John Greenleaf Whittier. Newcomers can choose from a variety of housing options that range from quaint old farmhouses and vintage colonials to new construction in modern developments.

Andover
Municipal Offices
978-623-8200
http://andoverma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-686-0900
www.merrimackvalleychamber.com

This picturesque New England town enjoys a distinguished history as an academic center and serves as the home of Phillips Andover Academy, one of the country’s foremost college preparatory schools as well as the nationally known Addison Gallery of Art. Local youth receive an excellent education in the public school system, highlighted by the 46-acre campus of the Regional Vocational Technical High School. This strong academic influence has encouraged a caliber of cultural and recreational amenities found in much larger towns. Andover is a lush, wooded town with generous lot requirements and boasts many acres of conservation land for recreation. Facilities include tennis courts, playgrounds, hiking and cross-country ski trails, and the Harold Parker State Forest. Many of the tree-shaded streets are lined with stately colonials. However, a variety of architectural styles in newer construction are also available to newcomers. Good mass transit options attract many commuters to Boston.

Beverly
Municipal Offices
978-921-6000
www.beverlyma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-232-9559
http://greaterbeverlychamber.com

Originally a large seaport, Beverly is now a summer haven for sailors and swimmers alike. Beautiful beaches, a picturesque harbor, and offshore islands for hiking and picnicking make this a popular seaside community. The community is ideally located just off Routes 128, 114, and Interstate 95, providing easy connections for commuters to area employment centers. Homes in Beverly range from modest frame houses in well-established neighborhoods to spectacular seaside estates. Some apartments and condominiums, many with views of the seas, are also available. The city manages to harmonize its manufacturing and residential elements for a balanced effect. An excellent public and private school system includes pace-setting programs for academically and physically challenged students as well as the Beverly School for the Deaf. Recreational amenities include public beaches, boating, fishing, parks, tennis courts, golf courses, YMCA, racquet clubs, and roller skating.

Cape Ann-Gloucester
Municipal Offices
978-281-9720
http://gloucester-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-283-1601
www.capeannvacations.com

Known for the purity of its light and breathtaking natural beauty, Gloucester has long attracted internationally known painters and sculptors, along with premier cultural organizations. The picturesque harbor that inspires artists also houses one of the top fishing ports in the northeast. This Cape Ann community also provides local employment in its industrial parks. The area known as Cape Ann is actually a blend of communities that encompass Gloucester, Manchester, Essex, and Rockport. Gloucester serves as a cultural center, home to the Cape Ann Symphony and Gloucester Stage Company—a community theater directed by a world-renowned playwright. Newcomers will be impressed by the sheer physical beauty and colorful diversity of this lovely seaside city. Many of the Cape Ann beaches, including Wingaersheek and Stage Fort Park, are considered to be some of the North Shore’s finest. Opportunities for outdoor enjoyment and relaxation include cross-country skiing, hiking, bicycling, observing nature, hunting, archery, picnicking, golfing, pool swimming, and tennis.

Danvers, Middleton
Danvers Municipal Offices
978-777-0001
www.danvers.govoffice.com
Middleton Municipal Offices
978-774-6927
www.townofmiddleton.org

Chamber of Commerce
978-774-8565
www.northshorechamber.org

Danvers is a quiet residential community of gently rolling hills and pine forests, yet it also offers a prime location near urban advantages and large shopping centers. Danvers’ attractive neighborhoods feature a variety of homes, from charming Victorians and oversized colonials in well-established neighborhoods to ranch and split-level architectural styles in more recently developed communities. Accessible to a number of major highways including Route 128 and Interstate 95, Danvers enjoys a prime location within Greater Boston. Wonderful beaches are nearby for boating, fishing, and water sports. Recreational amenities closer to home include a golf club, tennis courts, parks, and playgrounds. Middleton is a small, agricultural community just north of the shopping areas of Danvers offers a wide range of single-family homes on large parcels of land. Middleton residents enjoy easy access via Route 128 to nearby Interstate 95 and Routes 1 and 114, leading to key destinations like Salem, Danvers, Beverly, and Boston. Rail service into Boston is available in Salem. Quiet, tree-shaded residential neighborhoods are set at a distance from commercial activity, lending an atmosphere of tranquillity to daily life. Most homes in the area are older and new construction is rare. Ipswich River has a public beach for swimming, parks provide playgrounds, and ballfields. The town also has two private golf courses and country clubs.

Essex
Municipal Offices
978-768-7111
www.essexma.org
Chamber of Commerce
978-283-1601
www.capeannvacations.com

Few communities could be more successful than Essex at combining the contrasts of tourism, farming, and bustling seaside activities in a storybook village atmosphere. This unique blend of agricultural activity and open fields with charming antique shops and shoreline beauty attracts many visitors. Rich in popular restaurants, the area is famous for the Essex clam, a symbol of pride and quality. Clamming remains one of the town’s principal industries, celebrated in September at the annual Essex ClamFest. The smallest of the North Shore residential havens, Essex has managed to maintain the appeal of its non-suburban rural flavor. At the same time, it is considered to be an appealing community for commuters. Growth has been slow, and most housing options are custom new construction. Recreational amenities include tennis courts and a public golf course as well as swimming and boating on Chebacco Lake, the Gloucester beaches, and the Essex River marinas.

Georgetown, Groveland
Georgetown Municipal Offices
978-352-5711
www.georgetownma.gov
Groveland Municipal Offices
978-556-7200
www.grovelandma.com

Chamber of Commerce
978-373-5663
www.haverhillchamber.com

Georgetown and Groveland are residential suburbs popular with people working in Lynn, Lawrence, Haverhill, and Andover. The expansion of Interstate 95 and Route 128 has increased commuting options for those working in Boston. Essentially rural in flavor, these relatively small communities are home to new developments that offer home choices from spacious single-family homes on generous parcels of land to sprawling horse properties and acreage that include horse and large-animal privileges. Both Georgetown and Groveland began as farming villages and have managed to retain the essence of that “old town” atmosphere in spite of a growing population. A town of scenic rivers, Groveland has shifted from an industrial center into a quiet, residential haven. Home to less than 8,000 residents in 9 square miles, Groveland is slightly smaller than Georgetown.

Hamilton, Wenham
Hamilton Municipal Offices
978-468-2682
http://hamiltonma.gov
Wenham Municipal Offices
978-468-5520
http://wenhamma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-774-8565
www.northshorechamber.org

Distinguished as a spacious bedroom community dotted by large estates and open space, Hamilton is the former home of the U.S. Equestrian Team. Rolling fields, old stone walls, bridle paths, and riding trails grace this community, where handsome historic houses blend with quality new construction. The community of Wenham has retained much of its unique, historic character and tranquil rural scenery in spite of growth and expansion. Open vistas of farmland, lakes, woodlands, and old stone walls serve as a backdrop for winding tree-lined roads.  Nearly 300 acres of parks, playgrounds, and recreational lands provide outstanding opportunities for relaxation and recreation. Wenham is also home to Gordon College. Residents of the Hamilton/Wenham area enjoy a quick commute into Boston as well as easy access to the Atlantic seashore with its nature preserves, beaches, and boating opportunities.

Haverhill, Merrimac
Haverhill Municipal Offices
978-374-2312
www.ci.haverhill.ma.us
Merrimac Municipal Offices
978-346-8013

Chamber of Commerce
978-686-0900
www.merrimackvalleychamber.com

The well-developed community of Haverhill, nestled in the northeast corner of the state, is home to nearly 60,000 residents and sprawls over 35 square miles. Neighboring Merrimac offers a rural atmosphere to less than 8,000 residents in nearly nine square miles. Homebuyers can select from a wide range of housing choices including older Cape Cods, charming Victorians, multifamily developments, and estate properties overlooking Kenoza Lake. Once a leading shoe and mill center, the area has recently found renewed vitality in high-tech business populating the industrial parks convenient to Interstate 495. The mountains, lakes, and ponds that characterize the outlying sections form a panoramic backdrop for many delightful residential developments, while the area’s farming heritage creates a peaceful, pastoral setting. In 1995, the Haverhill area was selected as the Number One place to live in the Northeast and was ranked seventh in the nation by Money Magazine.

Ipswich
Municipal Offices
978-356-6600
www.ipswichma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-356-2916
ipswichchamber.org

Northeast of Boston is the historic and colonial town of Ipswich, site of the famous “taxation without representation” speech. White-spired churches, village greens, and more than 40 homes built before 1725 grace this charming residential community. A close-knit community, Ipswich offers the advantages of a fine school system, excellent facilities for leisure activities, and an easy commute into Boston by train or via Routes 1A, 128 and Interstate 95. An extensive variety of home styles are available, including modern condominiums, new housing developments, smaller residences for first-time buyers, and stately colonials. Set on the river for which it was named, Ipswich offers canoeing, swimming, and shellfishing along its banks. Crane’s Beach, one of the finest in New England, stretches over five miles of white sands and rolling dunes. Other recreational amenities include tennis courts, a golf course, and lush parks.

Lynn, Lynnfield
Lynn Municipal Offices
781-598-4000
www.ci.lynn.ma.us
Lynnfield Municipal Offices
781-334-9400
www.town.lynnfield.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
781-592-2900
www.lynnareachamber.com

Lynn is one of the North Shore’s most densely populated and highly industrialized communities. In spite of a strong manufacturing sector, Lynn offers a good selection of pleasing residential neighborhoods where single and multi-family homes are well maintained. Beautiful older homes are available in the eastern quadrant, and waterfront properties include handsome Victorians set along the shoreline. Lynnfield’s prime location between the major highways of Routes 1 and 128 has been responsible for its transformation from a sleepy farming community into an affluent suburb of people working in Boston and employed along the high-tech corridor. Although growth has been rapid, strict zoning have managed to preserve Lynnfield’s suburban serenity. Residents of the town’s quiet neighborhoods have access to a fine school system and attractive housing options that feature primarily single family residences in a variety of styles with well kept lawns and gardens. In addition to the close proximity of beaches for swimming, boating, and water sports, local recreational facilities include golf courses, tennis courts, playgrounds, and Pilling Pond for fishing.

Manchester-by-the-Sea
Municipal Offices
978-526-2000
www.manchester.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
978-283-1601
www.capeannvacations.com

The community of Manchester blends spectacular waterfront properties and mansions with colonials and contemporary homes. The lovely town center and beautiful Singing Beach have retained their original charm. Considered to be one of the most prestigious addresses on the North Shore, Manchester-by-the-Sea is a popular choice for commuters to the greater Boston area. As early as the 1800s, Boston residents were drawn to Manchester for its idyllic environment and tranquillity. Eventually, permanent, year-round residents began to change the complexion of the town. Commuting is easy via Route 128 and rail service is also available to commuters. Recreational amenities are first rate, from beaches to private clubs and sports facilities. This residential haven is bordered on the west by Beverly and Wenham, on the northwest by Hamilton, on the north by Essex, on the east by Gloucester, and on the south by the Atlantic Ocean. The picturesque 13-mile tidal shoreline provides several beautiful beaches, a renowned yachting harbor, and commercial lobstering.

Marblehead
Municipal Offices
781-631-0000
www.marblehead.org

Chamber of Commerce
781-631-2868
www.marbleheadchamber.org

Although fishing and lobstering are key local industries, Marblehead is best known as the yachting capital of the entire East Coast. This picturesque seafront town enjoys a large, deep-water harbor that offers an unequaled haven for boats and pleasure craft. Characterized as an affluent sailing community, Marblehead is an engaging blend of older and more contemporary buildings, charming cottages, and Federalist-style homes. Magnificent mansions can be found in the Marblehead Neck and Peaches’ Point enclaves. Retail development adds to the allure of the area. Scattered throughout the downtown and waterfront districts are upscale clothing stores, quaint art galleries, charming antique shops, and fine restaurants. Excellent schools and well-developed services combine with extensive recreational amenities that draw attention to the waterfront area of this desirable community.

Nahant
Municipal Offices
781-581-0088
www.nahant.org

Chamber of Commerce
781-592-2900
www.lynnareachamber.com

Nestled on one square mile, the small and sparsely populated village of Nahant is situated on a high, rocky peninsula that extends into Massachusetts Bay in view of Boston harbor. Once a pastureland for Lynn farmers, the community was transformed into a popular resort with transportation improvements. In spite of this, residents enjoy the seclusion this unique geography affords. While access to other North Shore communities is available, Nahant does not attract the heavy traffic common to most seaside towns. A single road connects residents to the rest of the world. Local conveniences and services provide a high degree of self-sufficiency. Nahant Beach is public and open to all but many of the homeowners enjoy waterfront access that includes private boat docks and beaches located at the back door. Other recreational amenities include a golf course, tennis courts, playground, and sports fields.

Newbury, West Newbury
Newbury Municipal Offices
978-465-0862
www.townofnewbury.org
W. Newbury Municipal Offices
978-363-1100
www.wnewbury.org

Chamber of Commerce
978-462-6680
www.newburyportchamber.org

Stretching over 26 square miles, Newbury is ideal for those who are looking for serenity and seclusion in a residential environment. The naturally beautiful area of Plum Island offers miles of unspoiled beaches for both communities, as well as a wildlife refuge and areas for picnicking, nature observation, and swimming. Set along the Merrimack River, West Newbury is also a sparsely populated, sprawling town where less than 5,000 residents occupy nearly 15 square miles. Both communities have managed to preserve their serene, rural atmosphere in spite of their accessibility to Boston via Interstate 95. Once a farming area, West Newbury’s heritage is still evident in the charming older farmhouses and rustic, well-kept older homes that punctuate the countryside.

Newburyport
Municipal Offices
978-465-4413
www.cityofnewburyport.com

Chamber of Commerce
978-462-6680
www.newburyportchamber.org

Distinguished as one of Massachusetts’ smallest cities, Newburyport boasts a history resplendent with influential leaders. Situated along the Merrimack River, Newburyport has been the cherished home of notables like Lloyd Garrison of the anti-slavery movement. From the springboard of its early prosperity and shipbuilding prowess, the community has evolved into a revitalized city where tourists flock to enjoy the showcase of its illustrious past. Quaint brick sidewalks grace the picturesque downtown district, graced by wonderful museums, specialty shops, and fine restaurants. High Street is unparalleled for its pure opulence, showcasing the magnificent mansions built by shipping magnates and wealthy sea captains. In addition to the recreational amenities of Plum Island, residents enjoy Maudseley State Park for picnicking, hiking, cross-country skiing, and summer theater.

Peabody
Municipal Offices
978-532-5900
www.peabody-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-531-0384
http://peabodychamber.com

A community of two distinct faces, Peabody is home to New England’s largest shopping center and economic development as well as charming residential neighborhoods. While Peabody has been one of the most receptive North Shore towns in terms of industrial growth and development, visionary planners have judiciously retained a large portion of the land and designated it as undeveloped open space. Part of the town’s magnetism for new business is the location along Route 128, a corridor that supports a number of industrial parks and retail establishments. The homes nestled in West Peabody include an attractive section of single-family residences that range from the modestly priced to exclusive custom construction set on lush, wooded properties that approach Lynnfield. Conveniently close to Boston, Peabody is served by an entire network of major highways and transportation conveniences. Recreational amenities include tennis courts, parks, playgrounds, swimming pool, hiking, and cross-country skiing.

Revere
Revere Municipal Offices
781-286-8100
www.revere.org

Revere Chamber of Commerce
781-289-8009
www.reverechamber.org

Revere is a highly developed residential Boston suburb, blending open space with industrial areas, commercial development, and residential communities. Diversity lends a rich and colorful history to many of long-established neighborhoods. Nearly 900 acres of Revere remains as wetlands and open water. Entertainment options close to home range from historical sites to the fast-paced thrills of dog and horse racing. In addition to beaches and marinas, parks and open space are ideal for ice-skating, hiking, bicycling, cross-country and downhill skiing, camping, horseback riding, and snowmobiling. Revere is home to a multicultural and diverse population, older residential neighborhoods, and several key attractions. The nation’s first public beach, the Suffolk Downs horse racing track, Wonderland dog racing track, and three MBTA public transportation stations are notable assets. During the past decade, an extensive system of parks has been developed and improved. Revere offers several historical sites, including the home of Horatio Alger, Ye Old Rumney Marsh Burial Grounds, Slades Mill, and the 1690 Tuttle House.

Rockport
Municipal Offices
978-546-5000
www.rockportma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-283-1601
www.capeannvacations.com

Situated at the tip of Cape Ann, the picturesque harbor town of Rockport is a magnet for visitors. Another Cape Ann destination for artists, Rockport maintains a very active arts association and is home to a number of outstanding studios and galleries. Bearskin Neck draws large crowds to its variety of shops and stores, while others prefer to study nature in such pristine environments as Thatcher Island or the Delmater Sanctuary. In addition to an abundance of sandy and rock beaches dotted by colorful fishing vessels and pleasure boats, Rockport offers such cultural attractions as the Historical Society Museum and Babson Museum. Rockport Country Club provides a lush golf course. Other recreational amenities include nature areas and parks for hiking, biking, picnicking, and cross-country skiing. The area is also known for its fine beaches and opportunities for boating, water sports, and salt-water swimming.

Rowley
Municipal Offices
978-948-2162
www.townofrowley.net

Chamber of Commerce
978-774-8565
www.northshorechamber.org

Located north of Ipswich, Rowley has retained much of the flavor and ambiance of its early agricultural days when it was the center of the American wool industry. A charming and rustic New England town, this sparsely populated residential community is a perfect choice for those working in Boston who want to return home at the end of the day to a quiet country setting. The close proximity of a state forest offers residents a host of outdoor recreational activities. Other amenities include a golf and country club, playgrounds, playing fields, boating at Rowley River, and ocean swimming. Expanded shopping facilities are just minutes from home in Ipswich, Newburyport, and the North Shore—one of New England’s largest retail centers. Interstate 95 and Route 128 both offer quick and easy surface travel to Greater Boston destinations, while commuter rail to Boston is available in nearby Ipswich or Hamilton.

Salem
Municipal Offices
978-745-9595
www.salem.com

Chamber of Commerce
978-744-0004
www.salem-chamber.org

Settled in 1629 and immortalized as the site of the 1692 witch trials, Salem is rich in history. For many years, Salem was celebrated as a shipping center that developed a thriving trade with China. Because of its historic legacy, modern Salem thrives on tourism and the hospitality industry. Salem is characterized today is a comfortable suburb, unique in its architectural blend of different time periods. Newcomers will find many new condominiums, elegant Victorians, antique colonials, and traditional suburban homes. Recreational amenities include golf courses, parks, tennis courts, softball fields, basketball courts, and the ocean-fed Forest River Park Pool. Forest River Park family park features beaches, picnic areas, and a fresh-water swimming pool for local residents. Visitors are drawn to tours of the House of the Seven Gables, made famous by Hawthorne’s novel, and the New England Pirate Museum.

Salisbury
Municipal Offices
978-465-2310
www.salisburyma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
978-774-8565
www.northshorechamber.org

The 350-year-old town of Salisbury is set on the Atlantic Ocean just south of the New Hampshire border. Once a popular summer resort, the community boasts miles of beautiful beaches that have remained a favorite with swimmers, sunbathers, or those who just want to relax and take a leisurely walk along the shoreline. Housing options are varied in this area, including waterfront properties, well-kept older homes, and some newer construction in a wide range of architectural styles. Single-family homes predominate, although recent growth has spurred the development of some handsome condominium properties. Residents appreciate the town’s peace and quiet and abundant open space. Salisbury State Reservation provides over 500 acres for outdoor adventure. Beaches, playgrounds, playing fields, and the Salisbury State Reservation are among the recreational facilities.

Saugus
Municipal Offices
781-231-4111
www.saugus-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
781-233-8407
https://sauguschamberofcommerce.com

Distinguished as the site of the country’s first ironworks, Saugus has reconstructed and maintained these historical industrial remnants in their original location. Located to the west of Lynn, the city still maintains a thriving industrial sector. Restaurants, shopping malls, entertainment, and retail establishments are situated along the Route 1 corridor, providing residents with a pleasing array of services and leisure attractions. Saugus offers a wide variety of housing styles in quiet, tree-shaded residential neighborhoods that have been set apart from commercial zones. Although the arrival of the Northeast Expressway has made it possible to reach Boston in just 15 minutes, MBTA bus service offers efficient transit service. Local recreational amenities include the YMCA, swimming pools, golf course, ice-skating rink, and the Break Heart Reservation.

Swampscott
Municipal Offices
781-596-8855
www.town.swampscott.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
781-592-2900
www.lynnareachamber.com

The seaport town of Swampscott is a popular choice with many new residents because of the emphasis on quality education, the beautiful coastline, and convenient rail and highway access into Boston. The town’s commercial center features clothing stores, restaurants and other retail outlets. Adding to the daily conveniences, two small shopping centers are located along Route 1A. The homes in Swampscott’s residential neighborhoods feature a pleasing variety of architectural styles and price ranges. Some elegant custom homes are ideally situated on ledges that overlook the ocean to offer spectacular views. Modest colonials, split entries, and charming Victorians are often nestled in the lush hillsides. Oceanfront beaches invite water sports and boating. Other recreational amenities include tennis courts, ballfields, playgrounds, and a private golf and country club.

Topsfield, Boxford
Topsfield Municipal Offices
978- 887-1500
www.topsfield-ma.gov
Boxford Municipal Offices
978-887-6000
www.town.boxford.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-879-5600
www.metrowest.org

Topsfield is known for its beautiful homes, an historic fair, and a distinguished New England town square. Although the community is relatively compact, it claims some of the highest elevations in the county and encompasses an area of rolling hills and winding streams. In addition to the picturesque Village Shopping Center, other small businesses include those lining Route 1. Topsfield is predominantly a residential haven with lovely neighborhoods and quiet, tree-lined streets. Single-family dwellings are the rule and range from modest houses for first-time buyers to magnificent estates. The community of Boxford is rural in nature and maintains its open feeling by zoning minimum lot sizes of two acres. One of the largest towns in Essex County, Boxford offers a pleasing mix of country living with convenient amenities. Ipswitch River and Bradley Palmer State park provide opportunities for boating, camping, freshwater fishing, hiking, horseback riding, and cross-country skiing. Other nearby amenities include a golf club and recreation center. Boxford also offers many in-town trails that make it popular with hikers and equestrians.