Search by List

Search by a list of area regions or city names.

 

Search by Map

Use our interactive map to find your community
 

FRANKLIN COUNTY

Franklin Regional Council of Governments
12 Olive Street
Greenfield 413-774-3167
www.frcog.org

Franklin County Community Development Corporation
324 Wells Street
Greenfield 413-774-7204
www.fccdc.org

Chamber of Commerce
395 Main Street
Greenfield 413-773-5463
www.franklincc.org

Franklin County is one of the most rural counties in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Farms, fields and valleys are home to historic villages and quaint New England towns. The area is a blend of wide expanses of open, rolling land, mountainous regions. The focal point of Franklin County is the City of Greenfield, the newest city in the Commonwealth and the largest in the county.

Services
The towns in Franklin County vary in size and style but all share a common history. Previously agricultural communities, they have become transformed into modern towns with carefully planned growth. Many towns have attracted new industries which have provided local employment opportunities. Education is a top priority and Franklin County’s school system enjoys an excellent reputation. The county offers a variety of housing choices including single family homes, apartments, and condominiums. Small farms and horse properties are also available.

Quality of Life
The Western Massachusetts countryside is a peaceful place with lakes, hills and Mountains. Residents can pick apples in autumn, go downhill and cross-country skiing in winter and enjoy the lakes and ponds during the summer season. The area offers residents and visitors a broad scope of enjoyable distractions including the City of Greenfield’s vibrant shop-lined downtown. Other attractions include Poet’s Seat Tower atop Rocky Mountain where hikers enjoy a bird’s eye view of hills and valleys. In the summer and fall the Pioneer Valley Symphony echoes in the air. Balloons fly overhead each July, during the Annual Green River Music & Balloon Festival on Greenfield Community College’s grounds. Cafes and shops provide ambience for artists, craftspeople, musicians and entertainers during the festivals and fairs each summer and fall. Quilts, scarecrows, livestock exhibits and competitions, parades, line dancing, musical entertainment and thrills shows vie for attention at the old fashioned Franklin County Fair.

Franklin County offers the unique opportunity to enjoy peaceful and picturesque surroundings, a variety of housing and lifestyle options with all the facilities and amenities residents could want.

Deerfield
413-665-1400
www.deerfieldma.us
www.historic-deerfield.org

The Town of Deerfield is an historic rural suburban center on the primary corridor between Northampton and Greenfield in the Connecticut River Valley.  It was the earliest community settled in Franklin County. Because of its strategic location, the town was subjected to repeated attacks from French and Indian forces through the early 18th century and was actually abandoned during King Philip’s war. The town boasts an outstanding collection of buildings that survive from this period, many still showing their battle scars. Visitors are able to tour 13 of the historic residences in the town. The early Deerfield economy was built on tobacco and cucumbers, pickle factories and the manufacture of pocketbooks. Today a major economic force in the community is the private schools.  Deerfield is home to Deerfield Academy, the Eaglebrook School and the Bement School – all world class private schools.  The town is also the site of a major craft fair each year which brings in over 250 exhibitors and is considered to be one of the most important craft fairs in the northeast.  The town’s museum offers 19 exhibit rooms and many concerts throughout the season.  The environment in Deerfield is one of an easy and relaxed atmosphere that residents and visitors can enjoy.

Erving, Millers Falls

Municipal Offices
413-422-2800
www.erving-ma.org

Chamber of Commerce
978-249-3849
www.northquabbinchamber.com

Erving is characterized as a highland industrial town along the bustling corridor between Boston and Greenfield. The town was named after the man who first purchased the land in 1752, John Erving. Erving Paper Mills has been in operation since 1905 and continues to be one of the major Franklin County employers. In spite of its manufacturing history, the town has preserved a rural character and offers large tracts of breathtakingly beautiful, undeveloped land. Laurel Lake and Erving State Forest draw regional visitors for outdoor adventures and recreation. These sites offer a lovely beach, boathouses, picnic areas, and tenting sites. The French King Bridge, which offers spectacular vistas, hangs 140 feet above the Connecticut River and links Erving with the town of Gill. Other points of interest include the Engine House Museum and Erving Castle on Hermit Mountain. The town is home to the three villages of Erving Center, Farley, and Millers Falls—also known as Ervingside. The Millers Falls area that lies south of the Millers River sprawls into the town of Montague.

Gill
Municipal Offices
413-863-9347
www.gillmass.org

Chamber of Commerce
413-773-5463
www.franklincc.org

Newcomers to the town of Gill will discover a rural residential haven that offers excellent educational and recreational services. Over the past few decades, Gill has transformed from an agricultural center into a bedroom community of primarily single-family homes. Gill is home to the highly respected college preparatory private school, Northfield Mount Hermon School. The town’s location on the Connecticut River has encouraged the development of first-rate boating facilities, both state-owned and private. Bass fishing is a common pastime. Barton Cove offers camping facilities, and river boat rides in this area pass under the historic French King Bridge, which overlooks one of the most breathtakingly beautiful areas in all of Massachusetts. Other attractions include equestrian trails, a local golf course, colorful annual events, and winter sports opportunities.

Greenfield
Municipal Offices
413-772-1500
http://greenfield-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
413-773-5463
www.franklincc.org

In July of 2003, Greenfield became the newest city in Massachusetts. Strategically located in the Upper Pioneer Valley just 20 minutes from Vermont and New Hampshire, beautiful Greenfield is brimming over with historic preservation and natural charm. The bustling downtown district is lined with small shops, two parks, a remodeled library, and popular restaurants. Home to Greenfield Community College, the city is also proud of an active cultural community that includes artist studios and performing arts groups. The historic Mohawk Trail commands spectacular views around the four seasons, although fall foliage is definitely the crowning glory. Agriculture, business, manufacturing, and service industries create a diverse and strong economy in this area which is well served by Interstate 91 and Route 2. Many residents enjoy frequent trips into Boston and New York for world-class theatre and shopping.

Leverett

Municipal Offices
413-548-9150
www.leverett.ma.us
           
Chamber of Commerce
413-773-5463
www.franklincc.org

Supporting a modest population, Leverett enjoys an idyllic location near the “five college area” and the wealth of education and cultural advantages those institutions provide. Residents of Leverett tend to blend teachers and students with farmers, lumbermen, gardeners, artists, and professionals in medicine and law. Home styles vary from well-crafted and beautifully preserved Federals and Greek Revivals to more modern Cape Cods and ranches. Remarkably rich in scenic beauty, the town offers such unusual landmarks as Rattlesnake Gutter Road, a two-mile road through a glacial ravine bordered by Brushy Mountain. The Sawmill River cascades over the rugged rocks in Moore’s Corner before spilling into the North Leverett mill pond with its picturesque historic mill. The centerpiece of the town, Leverett Pond, offers a tranquil retreat of quiet beauty. Points of interest include the historical society museum and a Buddhist Peace Pagoda.

Montague, Turner Falls
Town Hall
413-863-3200
www.montague.net

Chamber of Commerce
413-773-5463
www.franklincc.org

Encompassing five villages, the town of Montague is also located near Amherst and the five-college area of western Massachusetts. Turner Falls has emerged as the most heavily populated and industrialized of the town’s five villages, the others being Montague Center, Montague City, Millers Falls, and Lake Pleasant. Turner Falls is also home to the town’s governmental offices. Nestled along the Connecticut River in the upper Pioneer Valley, Montague claims a diverse and panoramic landscape of rolling hills, fertile farmland, historic mills, and residential neighborhoods. Both Route 2 and Interstate 91 are easily accessible for commuters or weekend getaways. The local arts community is lively, anchored by the Shea Theater performing arts center in Turner Falls. Montague is ideally located to offer easy access to some of New England’s finest skiing, canoeing, hiking, and biking opportunities.

New Salem
Municipal Offices
978-544-2731
www.newsalem-massachusetts.org

Chamber of Commerce
978-249-3849
www.northquabbinchamber.com

The small town of New Salem boasts one of the most picturesque traditional town commons in all of Massachusetts. Bordering the panoramic Quabbin Reservoir, the town also preserves the largest private collection of artifacts from the four unincorporated towns that were “lost” during the creation of the reservoir. The entire town of New Salem is listed with the National Register of Historic Places and proudly carries on its Yankee tradition today. Volunteerism runs high in New Salem, and the local arts community is unusually active. Points of interest include the Swift River Valley Historical Society’s holdings including the Whitaker-Clary House and North Prescott Church. A former Native American meeting site, the Bear’s Den is a 100-foot-deep gorge carved into granite cliffs by a branch of the Swift River. Quabbin Reservoir supplies Boston’s drinking water so recreational water sports are not permitted, but many outdoor activities are available around this scenic area.

Northfield
Municipal Offices
413-498-5103
https://www.northfieldma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
413-773-5463
www.franklincc.org

Serving as one of the cultural centers in Franklin County, the town of Northfield is home to the Bolger Arts Center and several performance groups. This rural community enjoys easy access to Amherst and Northampton in Massachusetts but also Brattleboro, Vermont, and Keene, New Hampshire. Northfield harmonizes the picturesque elements of rich farmland, forested hills, rushing streams, pristine wetlands, and abundant wildlife. The town is the only municipality in the state that is situated on both sides of the Connecticut River. Fascinating exhibits and displays that focus on the region’s past are available in the D.L. Moody Museum, the Northfield Historical Society Museum, and the Dickinson Memorial Library. The Northfield Mountain site is not only used by a major utility company for its generating plant but also provides a variety of environmental and recreational programs.

Orange
Municipal Offices
978-544-1100
www.townoforange.org

Chamber of Commerce
978-249-3849
www.northquabbinchamber.com

Serving as an industrial and residential community along the eastern boundary of Franklin County, the town of Orange is 86 miles from Boston. The community is actually made up of sections of Athol, Warwick, Royalston, and a tract of land called Ervinshire. Orange is distinguished as having the nation’s first automobile factory, and the local historical society maintains a 1904 Grout automobile as an example of the vehicles that were constructed in the town. Orange airport Industrial Park is filled with successful companies and businesses including major county employers. Each spring, the annual River Rate Race draws hundreds of canoes and thousands of visitors to this area. The town blends good schools and efficient services with attractive neighborhoods that show pride of ownership.

Shutesbury
Municipal Offices
413-259-1204
www.shutesbury.org

Chamber of Commerce
413-253-0700
www.amherstarea.com

Rural in character, the town of Shutesbury claims the distinction of the Shutesbury State Forest, where 845 acres of pristine woodlands encourage fishing, hunting, biking, hiking, and picnicking. Complemented by the private beach on Lakeview Road and a public boat ramp off Locks Pond Road, Lake Wyola is ideal for swimming, fishing and boating. Although lumbering does not have the importance it once did, some activity continues. Plentiful mineral springs drove another business in Shutesbury: bottled water. Close proximity to Amherst and the Five College Consortium ensures easy access to first-rate educational and cultural resources. The Quabbin Reservoir with its strict development guidelines also borders Shutesbury, enabling the town to preserve much of its original rural character. The panoramic region around the reservoir is a popular destination for outdoor sports and activities.

Sunderland
Town Hall
413-665-1441
www.townofsunderland.us

The Town of Sunderland is a rural-residential community in the southeast corner of Franklin County.  Sunderland has a long history of agriculture in its economic makeup, much of which continues today, including several dairy farms, tobacco farms, produce farms and maple sugaring businesses. Sunderland is home to Mount Toby State Forest, a popular hiking, biking and trail-riding spot.  The Connecticut River borders the town to the west.  The college town of Amherst is the town’s nearest highly populate neighbor and is in large part responsible for the high number of rental units in the town. Studies show  that Sunderland has the highest number of rental units per capita, outside of the City of Boston, more than any other municipality in Massachusetts. Several large rental complexes have provided housing for a population of students and staff from the University of Massachusetts.  Recently, young families from urban communities to the south have been moving to the area, diversifying the community and requiring new services from the school and town government.  Sunderland has constructed a new elementary school as part of this growth. Offering families of young children a great new facility for their  early education.  One the towns famous attractions is it’s “Buttonball Tree,” at over 350 years old it has strong presence on North Main Street and is a local tourist attraction.  Main Street (Route 47), intersected by Route 116 in the town’s center, is a scenic stretch of road, notable for its historic homes, wide lawns and maple trees.  The historic Town Hall and architecturally significant Graves Memorial Library, sit in the town center and provide a focal point for town activities.

Warwick
Municipal Offices
978-544-6315
http://warwickma.org

Chamber of Commerce
413-773-5463
www.franklincc.org

Residents of Warwick enjoy easy access to some of the finest recreational sites in Massachusetts, including Mount Grace State Forest along Route 78 near the New Hampshire border. Covering nearly 1,700 acres, this vast forest offers picnic areas with fireplaces, streams for fishing, multi-purpose trails, and winter sports from cross-country skiing to snowmobiling. The Mt. Grace summit is the second highest peak in the state east of the Connecticut River. Warwick State Forest features Sheomet Lake, a 31-acre trout-stocked lake that is also known as Clubhouse Pond. Famous rock formations punctuate the area, including Indian Cave and Wawbeek Rock. The local historical society proudly displays remnants and artifacts from the region’s past, which is celebrated in style each year during the Old Home Day. Although still a small rural town, Warwick has grown substantially in recent decades.

Wendell
Municipal Offices
413-544-3395
www.wendellmass.us

Chamber of Commerce
413-773-5463
www.franklincc.org

Another Franklin County community that claims its own forest, Wendell is home to Wendell State Forest and the Ruggles Pond recreation area. Residents and visitors alike enjoy the large ball field, the picnic areas, the groomed cross-country ski trails, and swimming and fishing opportunities at Ruggles Pond. This vast 7,900-acre forest also features Wickett Pond, which offers a boat ramp and Mormon Hollow Brook. Common pastimes in this area include hiking, horseback riding, snowmobiling, fishing, and hunting. Several dirt roads crisscross the forest. The Metacomet-Monadnock Trails offers a marked interstate footpath that links Connecticut to Mount Monadnock in New Hampshire for the truly adventurous hiker. Summertime heralds Wendell Old Home Days, celebrated in the town center with crafts, live music, and great food. A local coffee house offers “full moon concerts” on the Saturday night closest to each full moon.