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SOUTH WEST

Rural towns nestled in gently rolling hills, thriving urban cities with sprawling industrial parks, and serene residential communities filled with meticulously manicured lawns and well-kept homes can all be found in the region known as South West. This early-American agricultural expanse once offered a quiet lifestyle removed from the bustling city. However, with the industrial revolution, many rural communities were transformed into vital manufacturing centers. The region reinvented itself once again following World War II, when Boston’s more affluent residents began seeking out a suburban lifestyle in greater numbers.

Following the influx of new residents to the towns and cities west of Boston came the need for transportation improvements and new highways that could facilitate the flow of commuters. It was this very highway development that eventually set off the explosion of growth that has resulted in the “High Tech Mecca” west of Boston along Routes 128 and Interstate 495.

Bounded by key highways that encircle Greater Boston, the South West encompasses a number of communities where significant industrial and commercial developments emerged in the later 1970s and throughout the 1980s. The farmland that once dominated the area gave way to a more diverse economic base, and yesterday’s manufacturing activity transformed into precision instrument industries, defense, computers, and electronics. A large number of instrumentation firms produce measuring and controlling devices, laboratory instruments, and apparatus used in guided missile system or medical establishments.

 

Services
The Metro South region is particularly proud of its innovative community-based schools. Many new public and private schools provide exceptional technology and preparation for the children of the region. Higher education is attainable within the region at Bridgewater State College, Massasoit Community College, and Stonehill College. Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and many other prestigious universities are located within minutes from Metro South. Vocational and career training as well as highly specialized institutions of higher education provide virtually unlimited opportunity for personal growth and academic achievement.

Anchored by the internationally famous healthcare services of Greater Boston, the South West is well served by a number of community and general hospitals as well as suburban medical centers and clinics. Major hospitals in this region include Brockton Hospital, Caritas Good Samaritan Medical Center, New England Sinai Hospital and Rehabilitation Center, and the Department of Veteran Affairs Medical Center. In fact, the healthcare industry represent the region’s largest and most dynamic segment of employment.

Considering the quality transportation services available to the South West, it is little wonder that so many corporations and businesses have relocated to this area. Major thoroughfares including the Massachusetts Turnpike combine with the close proximity of Logan International Airport, one of the world’s largest air travel hubs. The Port of Boston, ConRail, Amtrak, and other services combine with mass transit rail and bus to efficiently move people and products. Metro South is minutes from Cape Cod and from Boston, strategically located on Route 24 between Route 128 and Interstate 495.

 

Lifestyle
Old-fashioned colonial towns boasting million-dollar estates, lovely older homes, and quiet neighborhoods along tree-lined streets blend with the finest quality new construction in a variety of architectural styles. Cape Cods, colonials, ranches, and country estates on sprawling acreage are all possible in the South West. Many consider the architecture and quality of homes in this region to be among the finest in all of Massachusetts. A few communities offer an abundance of condominiums and apartment complexes for a maintenance-free lifestyle, while others have retained a small village atmosphere where quaint single-family homes surround the village green.

Most of the communities that experienced a surge of manufacturing activity during the industrial revolution have either revitalized their economic base to reflect totally new industries or gradually transformed into bedroom communities that provide a serene residential haven for commuters. Because the towns of the South West share such a rich history dating as far back as the 1700s, quaint shopping districts and unique stores are often tucked away in smaller villages. Larger shopping centers and major malls are never more than a short drive from home for expanded shopping needs. Commercial development always follows a major residential boom, and the South West has seen both in recent decades.

Leisure activities are easy to find in South West cities and towns, where supervised programs are prolific and facilities are well maintained. Tennis courts, beautiful parks, swimming pools, ice-skating rinks, golf courses, and private clubs all provide hours of relaxation and diversion. Weekend getaways can include trips to the North Shore or South Shore beaches. Many South West communities are ideally located midway between Providence, Rhode Island, and Boston, giving residents easy access to the cultural and recreational advantages of two metropolitan centers.

Community performing arts, holiday festivities, and traditional celebrations have taken root over the years, preserving the grassroots integrity of early America within the heart of this attractive region. Whether you choose a lush, quiet New England village with historic colonials and forested land such as Walpole, or a prosperous industrial and residential city like Stoughton—South West communities are known for their friendliness, cooperative spirit, and enviable quality of life.

 

Attleboro
City Hall
508-223-2222
www.cityofattleboro.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-222-0801
www.unitedregionalchamber.org

Route 95 runs through the City of Attleboro, providing convenient highway access to Boston and key points in Rhode Island. Careful planning and strict zoning have ensured that serene residential areas and quiet neighborhoods remain unspoiled.

Although a pleasing mix of attractive and well-kept older homes are available, a surge of new construction has added homes, apartments and condominiums.

 

Bellingham
Municipal Offices
508-657-2801
www.bellinghamma.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-473-6700
www.milfordchamber.org

Strategically located along Interstate 495 midway between Boston and Providence, Rhode Island, Bellingham is a pleasant residential town that has retained much of its original rural atmosphere. Although Bellingham thrived for over a century as a center of industry, a massive fire in the late 1800s destroyed the factories and altered the evolution of the town into a quiet bedroom community. Bellingham is not opposed to quality industrial development, but the government and residents desire to balance growth with the preservation of open space and quality of life. Excellent schools offer a quality education to area youth, while adults find rewarding involvement in civic and social organizations. Single family homes offer architectural styles that include stately colonials and attractive Cape Cods. Silver Lake, Lake Hiawatha, and Theodore Arcand Park offer swimming, boating, fishing, and picnicking.

 

Bridgewater
Municipal Offices
508-697-0919
www.bridgewaterma.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-586-0500
www.metrosouthchamber.com

Home to Bridgewater State College, the “college town” of Bridgewater provides an atmosphere of intellectual, cultural, and recreational stimulation. Newcomers will find a pleasing mix of housing options that range from newer construction and well-kept older homes to apartments. The historic character of the community is beautifully preserved in the Federal, Italianate, and Greek Revival commercial and civic structures surrounding the town common. Limited manufacturing remains from the town’s proud industrial past, although Bridgewater is considered a residential haven for both Brockton and Boston commuters. The town is accessible by bus, commuter rail, and highway at the junction of Routes 24 and 495 for convenient travel to Boston, Cape Cod, and Providence, Rhode Island. The downtown district serves as the focal of community life, hosting holiday celebrations and festivals throughout the year. Recreational amenities include tennis courts, athletic fields, playgrounds, picnic areas, ice-skating, and Lake Nippenicket for swimming, boating, and fishing.

 

Brockton
Municipal Offices
508-580-7123
http://www.brockton.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-586-0500
www.metrosouthchamber.com

The City of Brockton serves as a major urban community south of Boston that claims a rich industrial history as a shoe manufacturing center from the 18th century through the 1950s. The city was also the site of pioneering projects in electrical power when the third electric power station in the nation was opened under the supervision of Thomas Edison in 1883. Many other “firsts” related to the use of electrical power occurred in Brockton. Today, the community prides itself on the diversity of its population, interests, and facilities. The city of home to the Fuller Museum of Art, considered by many to be one of the finest small museums in the nation. The Brockton Historical Society Complex is filled with museums devoted to shoes, fire fighting artifacts, and tributes to Thomas Edison. The honoring of sports heroes is another highlight of the community, including the world heavyweight boxing champion Rocky Marciano and middleweight champion Marvelous Marvin Hagler.

 

Canton
Municipal Offices
781-821-5000
www.town.canton.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-586-0500
www.metrosouthchamber.com

Rich in history and ideal for commuters, Canton is a heavily wooded suburb that maintains strict zoning to keep a careful balance between its residential community and commercial development. New residents are attracted to Canton due to prime location, the variety of quality housing, and excellent recreational facilities. Claiming historic significance as one of the places where Paul Revere lived and operated his “chopper works,” Canton is an attractive New England town that showcases elegant old colonials and working farms as well as newer construction. Full rail service is available to Boston and other key cities like New York and Providence, Rhode Island. Bus service to Mattapan connects with MBTA to Boston. Excellent public and private schools, skilled medical professionals, ample retail development, and recreational amenities add to the attraction of Canton. Over five golf courses combine with a swimming pool, tennis courts, ice-skating rink, and other sports facilities for local enjoyment.

 

Dedham
Municipal Offices
781-751-9100
www.dedham-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
781-769-1126
www.nvcc.com

Serving as the Norfolk County seat, Dedham is an old-fashioned colonial town that has grown slowly over the years and preserved its original character and charm. The vast majority of Dedham’s homes are individually owned and single-family in stile, ranging from vintage colonials in long-established neighborhoods and the “antique village” to million-dollar estate properties bordering the Charles River. Excellent public and private schools provide a quality education to area youth, emphasizing a progressive curriculum and many specialized programs. The Charles River area and well-developed community facilities provide abundant opportunities for relaxation and recreation. Amenities include an indoor swimming pool, town parks, playgrounds, picnic areas, and tennis courts. Easy access to Interstate 95 and Route 128 is complemented by two commuter rail stations that offer an easy commute to Boston’s South Station.

 

East Bridgewater
City Hall
508-378-1606
www.eastbridgewaterma.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-586-0500
www.metrosouthchamber.com

Part of the suburban area known simply as “The Bridgewaters” situated between Boston and Cape Cod, East Bridgewater exudes a country charm in spite of some commercial development. Large lots with an abundance of privacy and plenty of room for recreation characterize much of the housing available in this area. Good schools are complemented by the close proximity of two colleges: Bridgewater State College and Massasoit Community College.

 

Easton
City Hall
508-230-0500
www.easton.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-238-2225
www.easton-chamber.com

Easton offers a pleasing mix of older homes in a variety of architectural styles and price ranges as well as some rentals and condominiums. Easton is situated on Route 24 and provides easy access to Boston, Brockton and Providence.

Easton is also home to Stonehill College, a private coed institution that lends the cultural amenities and general stimulation of a “collegiate atmosphere” to this intimate residential community.

 

Foxborough
Municipal Offices
508-543-1208
www.foxboroughma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
508-339-5655
www.tri-townchamber.org

Midway between Providence, Rhode Island, and Boston lies the desirable residential community of Foxborough. The local economy focus in this community has shifted over the centuries from weaving straw bonnets and casting iron cannon balls to manufacturing enterprises that specialize in precision instrumentation. Strong community support encourages the outstanding school system. Housing styles range from ornately detailed Victorians and vintage colonials to contemporary styles in newer construction, both single-family homes and condominiums. Home of the New England Patriots football team, Foxborough is considered to be the “the gem of Norfolk County” by its residents. The team has performed at Foxborough Stadium on Route One since its opening in 1972. The only New England track for harness racing is adjacent to the stadium, Foxborough Harness Raceway. Recreational amenities extend beyond the football field and racing track. Fishing and boating on the town lakes, summer playground programs, golf tournaments, concerts on the common, and local drama productions are all popular pastimes.

 

Franklin
Municipal Offices
508-520-4949
www.franklin.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-222-0801
www.unitedregionalchamber.org

Established in 1778 and named in recognition of Benjamin Franklin, the community of Franklin serves as a suburban college town, a business center, and an industrial hub. Located on a watershed between the Charles and Blackstone Rivers, Franklin enjoys convenient access to major highways and also offers MBTA commuter rail service to Boston. Two large shopping centers provide ample in-town shopping. Franklin is home to a Tri-Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School as well as Dean Junior College. Franklin prides itself on the wide spectrum of architectural styles that are preserved in the community’s welcoming residential neighborhoods. Newcomers will find beautiful examples of handsome Greek Revival and Italianate buildings, as well as High Victorian Gothic, Second Empire, and Queen Anne architecture. Recreational amenities include tennis courts, playing fields, and Beaver Pond for water sports and fishing.

 

Holbrook
Town Offices
781-767-4314
http://holbrookma.gov

Holbrook is characterized as a suburban community set against the backdrop of a pleasant countryside. The community has experienced considerable residential and commercial growth, encouraged by good transportation efficiencies. With major state routes just minutes from home, Holbrook is ideal for commuters. MBTA train service to Boston is also available. Newcomers can choose from well-kept older homes and newer construction that includes a selection of condominiums for a maintenance-free lifestyle. Recreational amenities include tennis courts, playing fields, a golf course, playgrounds, and conservation land for hiking.

 

Holliston, Hopkinton
Holliston Municipal Offices
508-429-0601
www.townofholliston.us
Hopkinton Municipal Offices
508-497-9700
www.hopkinton.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-879-5600
www.metrowest.org

Once a quiet, agricultural community, Holliston still offers a friendly and tranquil atmosphere in spite of significant growth and expansion in recent decades. In addition to local shopping and services, this lovely suburb offers an ample supply of typically New England homes set in quiet neighborhoods or on rural side roads and lake fronts. Residents of Holliston are known for their welcoming attitude and the many hours they volunteer to service and civic organizations. Forested land, parkland, and the Audubon Society provide facilities for cross-country skiing and snowmobiling, hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, and hunting. Well-known as the starting point for the internationally famous Boston Marathon, nearby Hopkinton is an exclusively residential community. Recreational amenities include golfing, tennis, swimming, fishing, hiking, bicycling, jogging, and nature study. Two lovely lakes combine with the vast expanses of a state park to surround Hopkinton with unsurpassed natural beauty. Both towns offer easy access to the industrial parks of Framingham, Natick, and the Route 128 high-tech corridor.

 

Lakeville
City Hall
508-946-8800
www.lakevillema.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-947-1499
www.cranberrycountry.org

Spectacular vistas, open spaces, and numerous lakes and ponds grace Lakeville’s attractive residential developments. New residents can choose from appealing older homes to new construction with every possible amenity. Nearby Taunton and New Bedford expand the retail options, although local shopping is adequate for most needs.

Light manufacturing activity is scattered throughout the area, ranging from food products to manual machinery.

 

Mansfield
Municipal Offices
508-261-7466
www.mansfieldma.com

Chamber of Commerce
508-339-5655
www.tri-townchamber.org

Rapid development characterizes Mansfield in every sector, from residential growth to private industry and commercial expansion. Quiet neighborhoods along tree-lined streets contrast with spacious, secluded, wooded residential lots set back against the road. In addition to a robust economy and an abundance of land, Mansfield offers excellent mass transit and highway facilities. Interstates 495 and 95 traverse the center of the town. Good schools and a high quality of life continue to attract newcomers to this well-balanced community atmosphere. Recreational amenities include Filton Pond for fishing and boating, tennis courts, golf courses, parks, playing fields, and ice-skating facilities.

 

Medfield
Municipal Offices
508-359-8505
www.town.medfield.net

Chamber of Commerce
781-769-1126
www.nvcc.com

This small but attractive community provides the best of all worlds: A relaxed and tranquil residential haven within an easy drive of the vast amenities of major urban centers. Commuters can take advantage of bus service to Boston or travel by commuter rail through connections in the adjacent towns of Westwood and Walpole. An excellent public school system features departmental organization as early as fourth grade and accelerated courses that begin in middle school. With a history of stability, the town has balanced shopping and commercial areas with quality residential neighborhoods. Home choices range from antiques and vintage colonials to newer construction in a variety of architectural styles. The focal point of Medfield is Rocky Woods, a 400-acre reservation with bridle paths and hiking or skiing trails. Swimming is available locally at Hinkley Pond, while fishing and winter ice-skating are popular activities at Kingsbury Pond.

 

Medway
Municipal Offices
508-533-3200
www.townofmedway.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-473-6700
www.milfordchamber.org

Once a quiet manufacturing center that was part of Medfield, Medway has undergone considerable growth and has transformed into a desirable residential community. Medway has assumed a sophisticated approach toward development but has managed to preserve the charm and appeal of its small-town atmosphere. A wide selection of houses range from well-kept older homes to newer construction in a variety of styles and price ranges. Commuters appreciate bus service to Boston and Milford. Educational resources are exceptionally well developed, including regional facilities and programs shared with neighboring towns. Tutors, counselors, and advanced curricula meet the needs of every student. Civic organizations are strong and active. Recreational amenities center around Choate Pond Park and include tennis, fishing, swimming, sports play, and ice-skating.

 

Middleborough
City Hall
508-946-2415
www.middleborough.com

Chamber of Commerce
508-947-1446
www.cranberrycountry.org

Distinguished as the Cranberry Capital of the World, Middleborough offers a small-town atmosphere with a rural flavor. Cranberry bogs play a major role in the terrain as well as in the economic structure, and Middleborough has long been the home of Ocean Spray cranberry products.

The housing options are balanced between well-kept older homes along quiet, tree-shaded streets and newer construction in a variety of architectural styles.

 

Milford, Hopedale
Milford Municipal Offices
508-634-2307
www.milford.ma.us
Hopedale Municipal Offices
508-634-2203
www.hopedale-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
508-473-6700
www.milfordchamber.org

The settlement of Milford was first established as an industrial town filled with granite quarries and boot manufacturers. Today, the community continues its manufacturing legacy with an emphasis on laboratory equipment as well as glass and tiles. The pink granite that provided the town’s vital natural resource for so many years can be seen in many of the beautiful public buildings. Nearby Hopedale is a smaller community that began as a textile manufacturing town and has evolved into an appealing residential haven. Charming residential neighborhoods along tree-shaded streets and a primarily rural atmosphere attract newcomers who appreciate a tranquil lifestyle and small-town spirit. Although Milford offers a wide variety of housing options that include condominiums and apartments, single family homes predominate in Hopedale. Commuters in both communities will find rail service in nearby Franklin.

 

Millis
Municipal Offices
508-376-7040
www.millis.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-473-6700
www.milfordchamber.org

Midway between Providence, Rhode Island, and Boston is the verdant country village of Millis, characterized as an agricultural and residential community. Retail establishments are scattered through the area to provide daily conveniences to residents, although major malls and shopping centers are just minutes away. Attractive housing in a variety of architectural styles is available, from handsome older homes in comfortable neighborhoods to newer construction that ranges from modest to luxurious. Good local schools are enhanced by regional resources and facilities, including innovative programs for challenged students, vocational training, and adult education. Highlighted by a 27-hole golf course and a swimming pool, recreational facilities and amenities are high developed and would usually be associated with larger communities.

 

Norfolk
Municipal Offices
508-528-1408
www.virtualnorfolk.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-222-0801
www.unitedregionalchamber.org

Established in the 1800s from parcels of surrounding towns, Norfolk experienced a surge of growth and an acceleration of overall development when Interstate 495 became so accessible. Once an agricultural community, Norfolk retains much of the rural charm, relaxed attitude, and country feeling that made it so desirable to those who sought out a retreat from the “big city.” Even the town center mingles colonial charm with modern suburban conveniences. In addition to the many older homes, newer housing has been constructed throughout Norfolk. Common housing styles are colonials and Cape Cods set on ample lots. Commuters to Boston can access rail service right in town. Norfolk also provides an excellent public school system and numerous recreational amenities that include sports fields, tennis courts, public beaches, pond ice-skating, and an Audubon nature area.

 

North Attleboro
Municipal Offices
508-699-0100
www.nattleboro.com

Chamber of Commerce
508-222-0801
www.unitedregionalchamber.org

Well-served by a dynamic highway network that includes Interstates 95, 495, and 295, the town of North Attleboro is an ideal choice for commuters to Boston or Providence, Rhode Island. In spite of growth and expansion in the commercial and industrial sectors, restrictive zoning ordinances and cooperative planning have managed to preserve the tranquility of residential neighborhoods. Housing options are diverse, although the community claims an outstanding collection of mid to late 19th-century homes that include several villas of Italianate styling. Recreational amenities include a swimming pool, tennis courts, as well as public and private golf courses. The World War II Park adds a playground, a petting zoo, and an athletic field. Whiting Pond, Falls Pond, and Lake Como are available for swimming, fishing, and boating.

 

Norton
City Hall
508-285-0200
www.nortonma.org

Chamber of Commerce
508-339-5655
www.tri-townchamber.org

Home of Wheaton College, an outstanding private institution, Norton offers the stimulating atmosphere of a “college town.” The prosperous jewelry industry has long played an integral role in the local economy as well. This growing community offers a pleasing selection of older homes in established neighborhoods, in styles that range from modest dwellings to mansions and estates. A wide selection of newer construction can also be found in attractive developments.

 

Norwood
City Hall
781-762-1240
www.norwoodma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
781-769-1126
www.nvcc.com

The thriving business and industrial base that ensures low taxes for Norwood residents began in the 1700s. A variety of housing options characterizes Norwood, including showpiece rental complexes, senior housing facilities, new single-family construction and well-kept older homes. Nestled in Norwood’s historic district are homes that range from magnificent Victorians to early 20th-century mansions. The town’s attractive center reflects the local pride and support.

 

Plainville
City Hall
508-695-3010
www.plainville.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-222-0801
www.unitedregionalchamber.org

The attractive bedroom community of Plainville owes much of its popularity and growth to the major arteries of Interstates 495 and 95. An abundant housing selection offers a pleasing mix of older homes and new construction in a variety of styles and price ranges. Scattered retail activity provides daily conveniences, supplemented by the mall in adjacent North Attleboro. Located just outside Plainville are outstanding centers of entertainment.

 

Randolph
Town Hall
781-961-0900
www.randolphtownclerk.com

Chamber of Commerce
781-963-6862
www.randolphchamberofcommerce.org

Called “The Hub of the South Shore,” Randolph is a rapidly growing town with a new 150-acre garden style industrial park. The community is especially attractive to commuters who are looking for good public transportation and convenience to I-495 and Route 129.

A flourishing downtown commercial center provides shopping and services to residents. Older homes are located in elegant established neighborhoods. Newer apartments and condominiums are also available.

 

Raynham
Town Hall
508-824-2700
www.town.raynham.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-824-4068
www.tauntonareachamber.org

The attractive residential community of Raynham offers a quiet, New England atmosphere with very limited commercial or industrial development. Many new subdivisions are expanding the housing options, blending harmoniously with long-established neighborhoods of well-kept homes with meticulously landscaped yards. Interstate 495 and Route 24 make Raynham an ideal choice for commuters to Boston or nearby urban employment centers.

 

Rehoboth
City Hall
508-252-6502
www.town.rehoboth.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-222-0801
www.unitedregionalchamber.org

Close proximity to Interstate 95 makes this community an ideal choice for those commuting to a number of nearby employment centers such as Boston, New Bedford, Fall River and Providence, RI.

A pleasing mix of older homes and new construction characterizes the area. Residents can look to a selection of retail facilities for daily conveniences, although larger shopping centers are available within a short drive.

 

Sharon
Municipal Offices
781-784-1500
www.townofsharon.net

Chamber of Commerce
781-769-1126
www.nvcc.com

The fact that Interstate 95 traverses the community has contributed to Sharon’s growth and development as a pleasant residential haven with beautiful open spaces. The area’s lovely neighborhoods provide housing choices in a variety of architectural designs and price ranges that meet a diversity of tastes and budgets. The 400-acre, spring-fed Lake Massapoag represents the focal point of Sharon’s recreational activities, which also includes playgrounds, pools, athletic fields, a golf course, a country club, and Moose Hill Wildlife Sanctuary. The community recreation center provides a myriad of public programs, although Sharon is home to several private sports clubs including a yacht club.

 

Stoughton
Municipal Offices
781-341-1300
www.stoughton.org

Chamber of Commerce
781-297-7450
www.stoughtonma.com

Once an important manufacturing center for shoes, Stouton is characterized as a suburban community set against the backdrop of a pleasant rolling countryside. The community has experienced considerable residential and commercial growth, encouraged by good transportation efficiencies. With Route 24 running through town and Route 128 and Interstate 95 just minutes from home, Stoughton is ideal for commuters. MBTA train service to Boston is also available. Newcomers can choose from well-kept older homes and newer construction that includes a selection of condominiums for a maintenance-free lifestyle. Recreational amenities include tennis courts, playing fields, a golf course, playgrounds, and conservation land for hiking. Ames Pond offers swimming and fishing.

 

Taunton
City Hall
781-821-1000
www.taunton-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
508-824-4068
www.tauntonareachamber.org

Situated just 45 minutes outside of Boston is the community of Taunton, a suburban city where single-family, owner-occupied homes are the rule. This outstanding location for urban commuters offers a housing mix and older homes in quiet neighborhoods as well as sprawling new subdivisions that features homes in a variety of architectural styles. Taunton’s quaint Historical District showcases outstanding examples of Colonial Revival homes, sprinkled with Victorian mansions.

 

Walpole
Municipal Offices
508-660-7300
www.walpole-ma.gov

Chamber of Commerce
781-769-1126
www.nvcc.com

Lush, quiet, and self-contained, Walpole is a charming New England community that serves as a bedroom suburb. Newcomers will be delighted by the broad village green, spired churches, and vintage homes that grace the cityscape. In addition to limited rail service to Boston, bus service is available to Boston, Providence, Rhode Island. The scenic terrain that forms the backdrop this lovely community includes a town forest, several ponds, and a spacious park with natural facilities for boating and fishing. Most single family homes in tree-shaded neighborhoods are colonials or Cape Cods, although some condominiums are available. Walpole is home to a country club, a golf course, swimming pools, tennis courts, playing fields and playgrounds, hiking trails, and ponds for ice-skating.

 

West Bridgewater
Municipal Offices
508-894-1200
www.town.west-bridgewater.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-586-0500
www.metrosouthchamber.com

Although this residential suburb of Boston and Brockton has retained some of the elements of its agricultural past, West Bridgewater is evolving into a desirable and well-balanced community. Educational excellence and easily accessible employment opportunities combine with a pleasing mix of older and newer housing options to make West Bridgewater a highly livable community. Access to major thoroughfares has served to increase commercial, warehouse, and industrial activity. At the same time, the town preserves working farms that contribute to its scenic character. The area is particularly known for its concentration of antique dealers. The most beautiful site in the community is undoubtedly the historic War Memorial Park along Town River, lovingly restored through dedicated volunteers. Other recreational highlights include West Meadow State Wildlife Reservation and Pond, tennis courts, and outdoor skating rink.

 

Westwood
Municipal Offices
781-320-1013
www.townhall.westwood.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
781-769-1126
www.nvcc.com

An unusually attractive residential suburb, Westwood features local bus service that connects to MBTA rail lines. However, rail service from the Route 128 Station is only a 20-minute trip to Back Bay. Excellent public and parochial schools provide a quality education to area youth, while a full-time recreation department develops and implements programs and activities that appeal to all age groups and interests. Golf, indoor swimming, tennis courts, hockey, soccer, basketball, and baseball are just a few of the opportunities for fun and relaxation.  Westwood features a mixture of charming older homes as well as more expensive and newer residential developments. Commercial and industrial interests are growing, with more than 200 shops and businesses located in town. The community has established an industrial and office park and is actively encouraging the right combination of businesses that will preserve and even enhance the quality of life residents now enjoy.

 

Wrentham
City Hall
508-384-5400
www.wrentham.ma.us

Chamber of Commerce
508-222-0801
www.unitedregionalchamber.org

Well-served by Interstate 495, Wrentham is a popular residential choice for commuters to Boston and the 495 corridor of high-tech industries. Civic pride runs high in this community of primarily single-family homes, where older houses along tree-lined streets blend with new construction and rentals.

Open spaces and the availability of spacious lots make Wrentham ideal for those who desire a country feeling within a well-balanced community.